Best Portable Antenna

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Best Portable Antenna

N0AZZ
To the Group

 

I received so many helpful ideas and solid advise it's hard to single out a
single one for the best.......All I can say I received the best ideas here
than from any other spot many thanks to those who replied. This is why I
recommend Elecraft to anyone who asks is the company in general and those on
this forum for help. Product quality seems to follow after these other
things, but it really helps.

 

In summery I have decided I need at least 3 antennas for portable use
depending on conditions, just as I would at home. It looks like I made a
good decision when ordering to order the duel binding post BNC connector in
fact a spare is in order I think. I have stocked up on several BNC's since
the purchase of my KX3/K3's and preamps and such quality ones can be quite
costly but I hate cheapies.

 

Thx & 73 to all,

Fred/N0AZZ

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Re: Best Portable Antenna

Dave Van Wallaghen
Fred and all,

Realizing that the terms "best" and "portable" mean different things to
different people. Here is a portable vertical that I've been playing
with since June: http://www.n6bt.com/n6bt-Bravo7K-1.htm

This is a design from Tom Schiller, N6BT of the Force 12 era. He has an
entire new line with his new company. This antenna is an asymmetrically
fed vertical dipole. It supports 7 bands, 10m-40m via tuning of the
lengths of tubing and some loading coils on certain bands. It is full
length 10m - 20m and there is some loading for 30m & 40m. He touts
90-99% efficiency with upper 90's for the non loaded bands and 90-95% on
the loaded bands.

The asymmetric design allows the feedpoint to be at the bottom for ease
of feeding and keeps the center of gravity for the antenna near the
bottom. I ordered mine with the tri-pod base and made up 3 u-shaped
aluminum stakes to hold the tri-pod to the ground in the yard. So far it
has survived hurricane Sandy effects here in SE Michigan and winds over
50mph. I did have a 60mph gust last week that finally pushed it over -
no damage.

I regrettably have little time to operate these days, but when I'm doing
other things in the basement I run WSPR and have done direct comparisons
with my window line fed 140' doublet. It performs comparably in my
opinion. It exhibits the same properties as a vertical i.e. noisier,
lower take off angle etc. Using both antennas for diversity reception is
really cool. It almost eliminates QSB conditions sometimes in that if
the QSB is changing polarizations, you hear the signal move from one ear
to the other.

There was a review of this antenna in QST last year and some suggestions
were made by the reviewer, Ward Silver, N0AX, about mounting things more
efficiently for changing bands etc. All of the suggestions made were
incorporated in the version I received.

Although the price tag is around $290, I believe it is cheaper than some
of the comparable Buddi-system configurations. Obviously, I can (and
have) made simple wire antennas for far cheaper and perform well. It
just takes me a lot longer sometimes to get the wire where I want it.
The one thing I like about the Bravo 7K is that it is made from easily
purchased parts so that you can repair it in the field if necessary. I
found all the lengths of tubing on the DX Engineering site. All of the
hose clamps to secure the tubing are SS hose clamps found at most
hardware outlets.

It is portable and light, weighing in around 12 lbs or so, but not
something you'll want for backpacking or other type of operating where
keeping the weight down is a priority. I bought a drum hardware bag for
mine that holds the antenna and all supporting cables, stakes, rope,
tools etc. I made a W2DU balun for mine that is permanently mounted
underneath the loading coil box. I found that tuning it was pretty much
like it is laid out in their manual. I used a pipe cutter to notch my
tubing elements so that I can easily change bands in seconds without
remeasuring. It can be detuned fairly easily on 30 & 40m by large
objects or different soil near the placement.

I have taken it on a couple of small trips in the last few months and I
can set it up in less than 15 minutes and be on the air. I'm currently
stressing it out with a Michigan winter and hoping to be impressed with
its toughness if it still works this spring ;-)

I have no outside interest in this company, just a satisfied owner at
this point. YMMV.

73,
Dave W8FGU



On 01/29/2013 04:36 AM, Fred Smith wrote:
> To the Group
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Re: Best Portable Antenna

N0AZZ
Hi Dave

Thanks for the info, Nate had emailed me yesterday about it and I was sadden
to hear of his health issues that had caused him to pull back from the
project for a while. I linked to it yesterday nice to hear from someone that
has one in use for a while.

73,
Fred/N0AZZ

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Van Wallaghen [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 7:20 AM
To: Fred Smith
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Best Portable Antenna

Fred and all,

Realizing that the terms "best" and "portable" mean different things to
different people. Here is a portable vertical that I've been playing
with since June: http://www.n6bt.com/n6bt-Bravo7K-1.htm

This is a design from Tom Schiller, N6BT of the Force 12 era. He has an
entire new line with his new company. This antenna is an asymmetrically
fed vertical dipole. It supports 7 bands, 10m-40m via tuning of the
lengths of tubing and some loading coils on certain bands. It is full
length 10m - 20m and there is some loading for 30m & 40m. He touts
90-99% efficiency with upper 90's for the non loaded bands and 90-95% on
the loaded bands.

The asymmetric design allows the feedpoint to be at the bottom for ease
of feeding and keeps the center of gravity for the antenna near the
bottom. I ordered mine with the tri-pod base and made up 3 u-shaped
aluminum stakes to hold the tri-pod to the ground in the yard. So far it
has survived hurricane Sandy effects here in SE Michigan and winds over
50mph. I did have a 60mph gust last week that finally pushed it over -
no damage.

I regrettably have little time to operate these days, but when I'm doing
other things in the basement I run WSPR and have done direct comparisons
with my window line fed 140' doublet. It performs comparably in my
opinion. It exhibits the same properties as a vertical i.e. noisier,
lower take off angle etc. Using both antennas for diversity reception is
really cool. It almost eliminates QSB conditions sometimes in that if
the QSB is changing polarizations, you hear the signal move from one ear
to the other.

There was a review of this antenna in QST last year and some suggestions
were made by the reviewer, Ward Silver, N0AX, about mounting things more
efficiently for changing bands etc. All of the suggestions made were
incorporated in the version I received.

Although the price tag is around $290, I believe it is cheaper than some
of the comparable Buddi-system configurations. Obviously, I can (and
have) made simple wire antennas for far cheaper and perform well. It
just takes me a lot longer sometimes to get the wire where I want it.
The one thing I like about the Bravo 7K is that it is made from easily
purchased parts so that you can repair it in the field if necessary. I
found all the lengths of tubing on the DX Engineering site. All of the
hose clamps to secure the tubing are SS hose clamps found at most
hardware outlets.

It is portable and light, weighing in around 12 lbs or so, but not
something you'll want for backpacking or other type of operating where
keeping the weight down is a priority. I bought a drum hardware bag for
mine that holds the antenna and all supporting cables, stakes, rope,
tools etc. I made a W2DU balun for mine that is permanently mounted
underneath the loading coil box. I found that tuning it was pretty much
like it is laid out in their manual. I used a pipe cutter to notch my
tubing elements so that I can easily change bands in seconds without
remeasuring. It can be detuned fairly easily on 30 & 40m by large
objects or different soil near the placement.

I have taken it on a couple of small trips in the last few months and I
can set it up in less than 15 minutes and be on the air. I'm currently
stressing it out with a Michigan winter and hoping to be impressed with
its toughness if it still works this spring ;-)

I have no outside interest in this company, just a satisfied owner at
this point. YMMV.

73,
Dave W8FGU



On 01/29/2013 04:36 AM, Fred Smith wrote:
> To the Group

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Re: Best Portable Antenna

Don Wilhelm-4
In reply to this post by Dave Van Wallaghen
All,

OK, a great discussion, so I thought I would share the antenna I like to
use for portable.  It is basicly a 44 foot doublet fed with 300 ohm
ladderline (32 feet long with an additional 10 foot section that I can
add).  I couple that with my Jacktite 32 foot telescoping pole.  Things
fasten together with Anderson Power Pole connectors. In addition, I
carry 2 additional 22 foot lengths of wire.
I strap the pole to anything vertical, I have the heavy duty pole, so if
I can find a support that is 3 feet high or more, there is no need for
additional guying.

That antenna can deploy in a variety of ways.  If an additional support
is available, I use it as a horizontal dipole.  In situations where
there are low bushes around, it goes up as an inverted vee - just tie
the center insulator to the top of the pole and push it up - tie off the
ends to whatever supports are available.  If I want to operate 80 meters
or want better efficiency on 40, the two 22 foot wires are added making
it an 88 foot dipole.

If space is limited, or I want a vertical, one end of the antenna is
fastened to the top of the pole, and the other side of the antenna acts
as a bent radial (the feedpoint is 10 feet above ground).  The other two
22 foot wires can serve as additional radials.  Support the feedline by
whatever means available.

I use a switchable 1:1/4:1 balun at the end of the feedline and a short
length of coax to the rig.

So, you don't have to be slaved to any one type of antenna. Sometimes
'best' is dictated by the physical surroundings.  If you want to work
locals, use the inverted vee or dipole, but if you are trying for
something more distant, use the vertical configuration.
Other than the Jacktite pole, the antenna is inexpensive, but there is
no commercial offering, you have to build it yourself.

The 'magic' of the 44 foot length is that the antenna radiates broadside
to the wire with no lobes until you get above 10 meters, with the 88
foot length, lobes will be present above 20 meters.

73,
Don W3FPR



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Re: Best Portable Antenna

Randy Moore
I have also been pleased with the convenience and performance of a 44' doublet. I currently have one hanging in a vertical dipole configuration from a tree that's about 55' high. Works great on 40m-6m.

73,
Randy, KS4L

On Jan 29, 2013, at 8:06 AM, Don Wilhelm <[hidden email]> wrote:

> All,
>
> OK, a great discussion, so I thought I would share the antenna I like to use for portable.  It is basicly a 44 foot doublet fed with 300 ohm ladderline (32 feet long with an additional 10 foot section that I can add).  I couple that with my Jacktite 32 foot telescoping pole.  Things fasten together with Anderson Power Pole connectors. In addition, I carry 2 additional 22 foot lengths of wire.
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Re: Best Portable Antenna

Dave Van Wallaghen
In reply to this post by N0AZZ
Hey Fred,

Sorry to hear of Natan's health issues. I had a very hard time getting a
hold of Tom apparently due to some email server issues at the time. I
tried to order this before Dayton last year and never did get a
response. I wound up on Natan's email and he immediately got back to me.
He was very professional and cordial. He told me that they were getting
ready to move operations and that it would be 6 - 8 weeks for delivery.
I got it in 4 - it was everything they stated it would be and packaged
very well.

I read a number of folks that had "service" problems with Tom but with
Natan, my experience was a good one. I should drop them a note to let
them know how well it is working for me.

73,
Dave W8FGU



On 01/29/2013 09:04 AM, Fred Smith wrote:

> Hi Dave
>
> Thanks for the info, Nate had emailed me yesterday about it and I was sadden
> to hear of his health issues that had caused him to pull back from the
> project for a while. I linked to it yesterday nice to hear from someone that
> has one in use for a while.
>
> 73,
> Fred/N0AZZ
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dave Van Wallaghen [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 7:20 AM
> To: Fred Smith
> Cc: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Best Portable Antenna
>
> Fred and all,
>
> Realizing that the terms "best" and "portable" mean different things to
> different people. Here is a portable vertical that I've been playing
> with since June: http://www.n6bt.com/n6bt-Bravo7K-1.htm
>
> This is a design from Tom Schiller, N6BT of the Force 12 era. He has an
> entire new line with his new company. This antenna is an asymmetrically
> fed vertical dipole. It supports 7 bands, 10m-40m via tuning of the
> lengths of tubing and some loading coils on certain bands. It is full
> length 10m - 20m and there is some loading for 30m & 40m. He touts
> 90-99% efficiency with upper 90's for the non loaded bands and 90-95% on
> the loaded bands.
>
> The asymmetric design allows the feedpoint to be at the bottom for ease
> of feeding and keeps the center of gravity for the antenna near the
> bottom. I ordered mine with the tri-pod base and made up 3 u-shaped
> aluminum stakes to hold the tri-pod to the ground in the yard. So far it
> has survived hurricane Sandy effects here in SE Michigan and winds over
> 50mph. I did have a 60mph gust last week that finally pushed it over -
> no damage.
>
> I regrettably have little time to operate these days, but when I'm doing
> other things in the basement I run WSPR and have done direct comparisons
> with my window line fed 140' doublet. It performs comparably in my
> opinion. It exhibits the same properties as a vertical i.e. noisier,
> lower take off angle etc. Using both antennas for diversity reception is
> really cool. It almost eliminates QSB conditions sometimes in that if
> the QSB is changing polarizations, you hear the signal move from one ear
> to the other.
>
> There was a review of this antenna in QST last year and some suggestions
> were made by the reviewer, Ward Silver, N0AX, about mounting things more
> efficiently for changing bands etc. All of the suggestions made were
> incorporated in the version I received.
>
> Although the price tag is around $290, I believe it is cheaper than some
> of the comparable Buddi-system configurations. Obviously, I can (and
> have) made simple wire antennas for far cheaper and perform well. It
> just takes me a lot longer sometimes to get the wire where I want it.
> The one thing I like about the Bravo 7K is that it is made from easily
> purchased parts so that you can repair it in the field if necessary. I
> found all the lengths of tubing on the DX Engineering site. All of the
> hose clamps to secure the tubing are SS hose clamps found at most
> hardware outlets.
>
> It is portable and light, weighing in around 12 lbs or so, but not
> something you'll want for backpacking or other type of operating where
> keeping the weight down is a priority. I bought a drum hardware bag for
> mine that holds the antenna and all supporting cables, stakes, rope,
> tools etc. I made a W2DU balun for mine that is permanently mounted
> underneath the loading coil box. I found that tuning it was pretty much
> like it is laid out in their manual. I used a pipe cutter to notch my
> tubing elements so that I can easily change bands in seconds without
> remeasuring. It can be detuned fairly easily on 30 & 40m by large
> objects or different soil near the placement.
>
> I have taken it on a couple of small trips in the last few months and I
> can set it up in less than 15 minutes and be on the air. I'm currently
> stressing it out with a Michigan winter and hoping to be impressed with
> its toughness if it still works this spring ;-)
>
> I have no outside interest in this company, just a satisfied owner at
> this point. YMMV.
>
> 73,
> Dave W8FGU
>
>
>
> On 01/29/2013 04:36 AM, Fred Smith wrote:
>> To the Group
>
>
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Re: Best Portable Antenna

David Cutter
In reply to this post by Don Wilhelm-4
I like using plug-together sections.  Using 2 x 22ft sections on one side
and one 22ft section on the other makes a nice OCF dipole that is close to
50ohm on 40, 20 and 10 with a 4:1 balun.  Adjust middle and end height to a
good match without a tuner.  Other 1/3 2/3 arrangements can be made using
plug-together sections to cover more bands without switches or tuner.  Do
the same for the vertical version.

Even good quality tuners work better with loads that are closer to 50ohm and
the OCF with balun/choke makes it easy.

David
G3UNA


----- Original Message -----
From: "Don Wilhelm" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 2:06 PM
Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Best Portable Antenna


> All,
>
> OK, a great discussion, so I thought I would share the antenna I like to
> use for portable.  It is basicly a 44 foot doublet fed with 300 ohm
> ladderline (32 feet long with an additional 10 foot section that I can
> add).  I couple that with my Jacktite 32 foot telescoping pole.  Things
> fasten together with Anderson Power Pole connectors. In addition, I carry
> 2 additional 22 foot lengths of wire.
> I strap the pole to anything vertical, I have the heavy duty pole, so if I
> can find a support that is 3 feet high or more, there is no need for
> additional guying.
>
> That antenna can deploy in a variety of ways.  If an additional support is
> available, I use it as a horizontal dipole.  In situations where there are
> low bushes around, it goes up as an inverted vee - just tie the center
> insulator to the top of the pole and push it up - tie off the ends to
> whatever supports are available.  If I want to operate 80 meters or want
> better efficiency on 40, the two 22 foot wires are added making it an 88
> foot dipole.
>
> If space is limited, or I want a vertical, one end of the antenna is
> fastened to the top of the pole, and the other side of the antenna acts as
> a bent radial (the feedpoint is 10 feet above ground).  The other two 22
> foot wires can serve as additional radials.  Support the feedline by
> whatever means available.
>
> I use a switchable 1:1/4:1 balun at the end of the feedline and a short
> length of coax to the rig.
>
> So, you don't have to be slaved to any one type of antenna. Sometimes
> 'best' is dictated by the physical surroundings.  If you want to work
> locals, use the inverted vee or dipole, but if you are trying for
> something more distant, use the vertical configuration.
> Other than the Jacktite pole, the antenna is inexpensive, but there is no
> commercial offering, you have to build it yourself.
>
> The 'magic' of the 44 foot length is that the antenna radiates broadside
> to the wire with no lobes until you get above 10 meters, with the 88 foot
> length, lobes will be present above 20 meters.
>
> 73,
> Don W3FPR
>
>
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Re: Best Portable Antenna

David McAnally
In reply to this post by N0AZZ
I don't recall seeing anyone mention the new CrankIR portable vertical
antenna from SteppIR.  Supposed to be available this spring.  Scroll down
on their home page to see the announcement. http://www.steppir.com/

Personally, I use a home made 80M OCF dipole at the moment.

Regards,
David McAnally
WD5M

On Tue, Jan 29, 2013 at 3:36 AM, Fred Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

> To the Group
>
>
>
> I received so many helpful ideas and solid advise it's hard to single out a
> single one for the best.......All I can say I received the best ideas here
> than from any other spot many thanks to those who replied. This is why I
> recommend Elecraft to anyone who asks is the company in general and those
> on
> this forum for help. Product quality seems to follow after these other
> things, but it really helps.
>
>
>
> In summery I have decided I need at least 3 antennas for portable use
> depending on conditions, just as I would at home. It looks like I made a
> good decision when ordering to order the duel binding post BNC connector in
> fact a spare is in order I think. I have stocked up on several BNC's since
> the purchase of my KX3/K3's and preamps and such quality ones can be quite
> costly but I hate cheapies.
>
>
>
> Thx & 73 to all,
>
> Fred/N0AZZ
>
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Re: Best Portable Antenna

N0AZZ
I'm not a big fan of SteppIR a little overpriced and for me their beams were
not a good choice because of the Stepper motors a lot of ice and wind here.
Service issues would be a problem also no tower for me lol. I did look at
that it looks like a fiberglass windsock pole and a fishing reel would work
about the same and they are 31'.

 

Fred/N0AZZ

 

From: David McAnally [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 9:29 AM
To: Fred Smith
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Best Portable Antenna

 

I don't recall seeing anyone mention the new CrankIR portable vertical
antenna from SteppIR.  Supposed to be available this spring.  Scroll down on
their home page to see the announcement. http://www.steppir.com/ 

 

Personally, I use a home made 80M OCF dipole at the moment.

 

Regards,

David McAnally

WD5M

On Tue, Jan 29, 2013 at 3:36 AM, Fred Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

To the Group



I received so many helpful ideas and solid advise it's hard to single out a
single one for the best.......All I can say I received the best ideas here
than from any other spot many thanks to those who replied. This is why I
recommend Elecraft to anyone who asks is the company in general and those on
this forum for help. Product quality seems to follow after these other
things, but it really helps.



In summery I have decided I need at least 3 antennas for portable use
depending on conditions, just as I would at home. It looks like I made a
good decision when ordering to order the duel binding post BNC connector in
fact a spare is in order I think. I have stocked up on several BNC's since
the purchase of my KX3/K3's and preamps and such quality ones can be quite
costly but I hate cheapies.



Thx & 73 to all,

Fred/N0AZZ

 

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Re: Best Portable Antenna

stan levandowski
In reply to this post by N0AZZ
I have one more 'fallback' system that might be worth mentioning here.
For those situations where I cannot be nearer to my antenna and must
deal with a longer transmission line, I use my SGC-211 remote
autocoupler.  It runs for 5 years on a handful of "AA" batteries.  It
will tune just about anything, just like the KX3.  The advantage is a
long and "clean" coax run to the radio, whereever that might happen to
be located.  Here's a practical example:  Maybe I want to put up a
stealth loop or  random wire, or even a Delta loop or a doublet.  The
only place to do so might be at some distance from the transmitter, for
example, trees way out back of a townhouse or condo.  I can put the
SG-211 out there at the feedpoint, bury my coax cable in a shallow slit
trench, and no one is the wiser.  Disadvantages:  Limited to 60 watts,
not naturally weatherproof.  Advantages: battery operated, a shot of RF
tunes it, and the RF is kept out of the shack.  Availability:  it's a
seasonal product and I've never seen one listed anywhere 'used'. eHAM
ratings are not that great because there used to be a problem with it
randomly re-tuning and the pre-2007 comments about this drag down the
overall rating.  There is now a tune-lock switch and I have not had any
problems myself.   It's not a perfect solution but one worth at least
knowing exists.  73, Stan WB2LQF


> On Tue, Jan 29, 2013 at 3:36 AM, Fred Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

>> I received so many helpful ideas and solid advise it's hard to single
>> out a
>> single one for the best.......All I can say I received the best ideas
>> here
>> than from any other spot many thanks to those who replied. This is
>> why I
>> recommend Elecraft to anyone who asks is the company in general and
>> those
>> on this forum for help. Product quality seems to follow after these
>> other
>> things, but it really helps.
>>
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Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
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Re: Best Portable Antenna

Phil Hystad-3
In reply to this post by N0AZZ
Does anyone know more about the new SteppIR CrankIR?  For instance, I assume it needs a ground plane and the photo seems to show it elevated like on a back deck or something.  I should probably just drive down to SteppIR in Bellevue this afternoon and ask them, it is a 15 minute drive.  If I find out anything I will report back if anyone is interested.  I have found that companies are more easy to give out information in person then on the phone.

73, phil, K7PEH


On Jan 29, 2013, at 7:48 AM, Fred Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I'm not a big fan of SteppIR a little overpriced and for me their beams were
> not a good choice because of the Stepper motors a lot of ice and wind here.
> Service issues would be a problem also no tower for me lol. I did look at
> that it looks like a fiberglass windsock pole and a fishing reel would work
> about the same and they are 31'.
>
>
>
> Fred/N0AZZ
>
>
>
> From: David McAnally [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 9:29 AM
> To: Fred Smith
> Cc: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Best Portable Antenna
>
>
>
> I don't recall seeing anyone mention the new CrankIR portable vertical
> antenna from SteppIR.  Supposed to be available this spring.  Scroll down on
> their home page to see the announcement. http://www.steppir.com/ 
>
>
>
> Personally, I use a home made 80M OCF dipole at the moment.
>
>
>
> Regards,
>
> David McAnally
>
> WD5M
>
> On Tue, Jan 29, 2013 at 3:36 AM, Fred Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> To the Group
>
>
>
> I received so many helpful ideas and solid advise it's hard to single out a
> single one for the best.......All I can say I received the best ideas here
> than from any other spot many thanks to those who replied. This is why I
> recommend Elecraft to anyone who asks is the company in general and those on
> this forum for help. Product quality seems to follow after these other
> things, but it really helps.
>
>
>
> In summery I have decided I need at least 3 antennas for portable use
> depending on conditions, just as I would at home. It looks like I made a
> good decision when ordering to order the duel binding post BNC connector in
> fact a spare is in order I think. I have stocked up on several BNC's since
> the purchase of my KX3/K3's and preamps and such quality ones can be quite
> costly but I hate cheapies.
>
>
>
> Thx & 73 to all,
>
> Fred/N0AZZ
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html

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Re: Best Portable Antenna

N0AZZ
In reply to this post by stan levandowski
Stan

That is an SGC product that I didn't even know they had, I'll look it up.
Guys I've been keeping Google busy yesterday and today a lot of really good
information. I hope a few of the group has enjoyed some of this as much as I
have and a lot applies not to just my original QRP antenna either.

Time to reload the printer with more paper.

Fred/N0AZZ

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of stan levandowski
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 10:20 AM
Cc: Elecraft List
Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Best Portable Antenna

I have one more 'fallback' system that might be worth mentioning here.
For those situations where I cannot be nearer to my antenna and must deal
with a longer transmission line, I use my SGC-211 remote autocoupler.  It
runs for 5 years on a handful of "AA" batteries.  It will tune just about
anything, just like the KX3.  The advantage is a long and "clean" coax run
to the radio, whereever that might happen to be located.  Here's a practical
example:  Maybe I want to put up a stealth loop or  random wire, or even a
Delta loop or a doublet.  The only place to do so might be at some distance
from the transmitter, for example, trees way out back of a townhouse or
condo.  I can put the
SG-211 out there at the feedpoint, bury my coax cable in a shallow slit
trench, and no one is the wiser.  Disadvantages:  Limited to 60 watts, not
naturally weatherproof.  Advantages: battery operated, a shot of RF tunes
it, and the RF is kept out of the shack.  Availability:  it's a seasonal
product and I've never seen one listed anywhere 'used'. eHAM ratings are not
that great because there used to be a problem with it randomly re-tuning and
the pre-2007 comments about this drag down the overall rating.  There is now
a tune-lock switch and I have not had any
problems myself.   It's not a perfect solution but one worth at least
knowing exists.  73, Stan WB2LQF


> On Tue, Jan 29, 2013 at 3:36 AM, Fred Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

>> I received so many helpful ideas and solid advise it's hard to single
>> out a single one for the best.......All I can say I received the best
>> ideas here than from any other spot many thanks to those who replied.
>> This is why I recommend Elecraft to anyone who asks is the company in
>> general and those on this forum for help. Product quality seems to
>> follow after these other things, but it really helps.
>>
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Re: Best Portable Antenna

Phil Hystad-3
In reply to this post by N0AZZ
Mike,

That previous post by David McAnally links to a blog that has some good information.
I read that and I will probably put off heading into Bellevue today (maybe).  The
David McAnally link to the block answered my questions for now.

73, phil, K7PEH


On Jan 29, 2013, at 8:48 AM, K2MK <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Phil,
>
> I would be interested in hearing more about it. Just curious more than anything.
>
> 73,
> Mike K2MK
>
>
> Does anyone know more about the new SteppIR CrankIR?  For instance, I assume it
> needs a ground plane and the photo seems to show it elevated like on a back
> deck or something.  I should probably just drive down to SteppIR in Bellevue
> this afternoon and ask them, it is a 15 minute drive.  If I find out anything I
> will report back if anyone is interested.  I have found that companies are more
> easy to give out information in person then on the phone.
>
>
> 73, phil, K7PEH

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Re: Best Portable Antenna

Richard Gillingham
In reply to this post by Phil Hystad-3

Yes, do please let us know what you find.  I'm really interested.  They'll probably roll it out at Dayton.
73
Gil, W1RG

> From: [hidden email]
> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2013 08:25:00 -0800
> To: [hidden email]
> CC: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Best Portable Antenna
>
> Does anyone know more about the new SteppIR CrankIR?  For instance, I assume it needs a ground plane and the photo seems to show it elevated like on a back deck or something.  I should probably just drive down to SteppIR in Bellevue this afternoon and ask them, it is a 15 minute drive.  If I find out anything I will report back if anyone is interested.  I have found that companies are more easy to give out information in person then on the phone.
>
> 73, phil, K7PEH
>
>
> On Jan 29, 2013, at 7:48 AM, Fred Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > I'm not a big fan of SteppIR a little overpriced and for me their beams were
> > not a good choice because of the Stepper motors a lot of ice and wind here.
> > Service issues would be a problem also no tower for me lol. I did look at
> > that it looks like a fiberglass windsock pole and a fishing reel would work
> > about the same and they are 31'.
> >
> >
> >
> > Fred/N0AZZ
> >
> >
> >
> > From: David McAnally [mailto:[hidden email]]
> > Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 9:29 AM
> > To: Fred Smith
> > Cc: [hidden email]
> > Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Best Portable Antenna
> >
> >
> >
> > I don't recall seeing anyone mention the new CrankIR portable vertical
> > antenna from SteppIR.  Supposed to be available this spring.  Scroll down on
> > their home page to see the announcement. http://www.steppir.com/ 
> >
> >
> >
> > Personally, I use a home made 80M OCF dipole at the moment.
> >
> >
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > David McAnally
> >
> > WD5M
> >
> > On Tue, Jan 29, 2013 at 3:36 AM, Fred Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > To the Group
> >
> >
> >
> > I received so many helpful ideas and solid advise it's hard to single out a
> > single one for the best.......All I can say I received the best ideas here
> > than from any other spot many thanks to those who replied. This is why I
> > recommend Elecraft to anyone who asks is the company in general and those on
> > this forum for help. Product quality seems to follow after these other
> > things, but it really helps.
> >
> >
> >
> > In summery I have decided I need at least 3 antennas for portable use
> > depending on conditions, just as I would at home. It looks like I made a
> > good decision when ordering to order the duel binding post BNC connector in
> > fact a spare is in order I think. I have stocked up on several BNC's since
> > the purchase of my KX3/K3's and preamps and such quality ones can be quite
> > costly but I hate cheapies.
> >
> >
> >
> > Thx & 73 to all,
> >
> > Fred/N0AZZ
> >
> >
> >
> > ______________________________________________________________
> > Elecraft mailing list
> > Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> > Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> > Post: mailto:[hidden email]
> >
> > This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> > Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
     
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Re: Best Portable Antenna

n5ib
In reply to this post by N0AZZ
I put this together a few months ago for a trip along the Blue Ridge
Parkway, and it served well from our "cabin in the woods" Wanted to try
it at the seashore near Hatteras but the weather cut thr trip short.

Jackite 31' fiberglas mast, with the very top section replaced by a
broken piece from an earlier mishap. AWG14 stranded wire runs **inside**
the mast from the bottom until it protrudes an inch or so from the top of
the (now hollow all the way) tip section.

A little fitting made of PC board with a BNC for coax feed, and four
screw lugs for radials/counterpoises. I usually use two pieces of AWG22
about 60 ft long and just stretch them out along the ground, zigzagging
or bending as needs for the space. vertical counductor connects to BNC
center with ring lugs and thumbscrews.

T1 autotuner connected at the base with a bias tee in front of it.
Another bias tee at the transmitter end. Optocoupler at the antenna end
bias tee connected to remote jack of the T1. Battery and PB switch at the
bias tee transmitter end.

I carry a piece of rebar and hammer. A 3 ft section of PVC pipe large
enough to slip **over** the bottom section of the Jackite. Some PVC Ts
are drilled to slip over the rebar.

Have used it on 80, 40, 30, 20, 17, 15, 12, and 10. I'm beginning to
believe it works better than my 40 m full wave loop at home that is only
15 ft or so off the ground.

73,
Jim, N5IB
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Re: best portable antenna

mikerodgerske5gbc
In reply to this post by N0AZZ
Did anyone mention the NorCal Qrp dipole made from 4 conductor computer ribbon?

It forms the dipole and parrarel feedline including support loop. Fishing swivels can be used as additional hardware.
It looks very neat!

4 conductor ribbon.
2 outside wires form the dipole and feedline with the two center wires forming a center tie off and support for the feedline.
I've got a link or something somewhere but you can prob google it.

73
Mike R

Play me some fiddle, but no stinkin' violin!

Amateur/Ham Radio KE5GBC
HF & Echolink mobile
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