Camping radio ops: then and now

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Camping radio ops: then and now

wayne burdick
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My first attempt to operate from a campsite was in 1972, when I was 14. My dad chuckled as I hefted my box of gear into the camper. At the time I had no battery powered radios. The receiver was a Heathkit HR-10B. The transmitter was a 3-tube, 10-watt, WW2 CW monstrosity I borrowed from someone in the El Cajon ARC. I also didn't have an antenna tuner, so I brought a full-size 40-m dipole with #18 wire and 100' of RG58. Keyer was a Heath HD-10.

Our campsite in Utah didn't have an electrical outlet. Fortunately I had a very long extension cord that I routed through the window of the  men's room, two campsites down. I had to apologize to hostile strangers as I wove the cord through bushes and around cars.

Getting the heavy dipole up into the ponderosas required rope, rocks, and a few swear words I hadn't used in front of my parents prior to that time.

Finally, I was on the air. Unfortunately the band wasn't particularly open that day, and I think I ended up making three contacts. Still, I got The Bug.

These days, I use a KX2, two lengths of #26 wire, an earbud/mic, and a KXPD2 paddle. Total station weight: 2 lbs, counting the CS40 bag. Setup time: 2 or 3 minutes, depending on how many times it takes to hit just the right branch with a 1 ounce stainless steel weight. Or 1 minute if I'm using a whip.

It's been a wild journey that I suppose could be graphed in terms of miles per watt per pound over 40 years.

I bet there a few other variations on this theme....

73,
Wayne
N6KR



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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

K9MA
For what it's worth, here's my recent solution for bicycle portable
operation:

http://cwt1605k9ma.blogspot.com/2016/08/equipment.html

It weighs a bit more than Wayne's station, but I don't need trees to
hold the antenna up.


73,

Scott  K9MA


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Re: [KX3] Camping radio ops: then and now

Alan Bloom
In reply to this post by wayne burdick


On 10/04/2016 09:36 AM, Wayne Burdick [hidden email] [KX3] wrote:

> My first attempt to operate from a campsite was in 1972, when I was 14. My dad chuckled as I hefted my box of gear into the camper. At the time I had no battery powered radios. The receiver was a Heathkit HR-10B. The transmitter was a 3-tube, 10-watt, WW2 CW monstrosity I borrowed from someone in the El Cajon ARC. I also didn't have an antenna tuner, so I brought a full-size 40-m dipole with #18 wire and 100' of RG58. Keyer was a Heath HD-10.
>
> Our campsite in Utah didn't have an electrical outlet. Fortunately I had a very long extension cord that I routed through the window of the  men's room, two campsites down. I had to apologize to hostile strangers as I wove the cord through bushes and around cars.
>
> Getting the heavy dipole up into the ponderosas required rope, rocks, and a few swear words I hadn't used in front of my parents prior to that time.
>
> Finally, I was on the air. Unfortunately the band wasn't particularly open that day, and I think I ended up making three contacts. Still, I got The Bug.
>
> These days, I use a KX2, two lengths of #26 wire, an earbud/mic, and a KXPD2 paddle. Total station weight: 2 lbs, counting the CS40 bag. Setup time: 2 or 3 minutes, depending on how many times it takes to hit just the right branch with a 1 ounce stainless steel weight. Or 1 minute if I'm using a whip.
>
> It's been a wild journey that I suppose could be graphed in terms of miles per watt per pound over 40 years.
>
> I bet there a few other variations on this theme....
>
> 73,
> Wayne
> N6KR
>
>
>
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Re: [KX3] Camping radio ops: then and now

Alan Bloom-2
In reply to this post by wayne burdick
Other than Field Day, my first true portable operation was one summer
around 1970 when I spent summer vacation working as a waiter in a Swiss
hotel.  I got a callsign (HB9XVK if I remember right) and took along an
all-homebrew CW station.  The receiver was a transistorized direct
conversion type and the transmitter was an "AC-DC" type:  it ran
directly off 120VAC with no transformer.  The tube filaments were wired
in series (I think the lineup was two 50C5s and a 12AU7 or something
like that) and the high voltage was rectified directly from the AC line.
  Of course I had to use an autotransformer to make it work with
European 240VAC.

Then the hotel put me in a basement room where the window looked out
onto a patio, so I wasn't able to put up a decent antenna.  I think I
only made two or three contacts.

Alan N1AL


On 10/04/2016 09:36 AM, Wayne Burdick [hidden email] [KX3] wrote:
> My first attempt to operate from a campsite was in 1972, when I was
> 14.

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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Kevin - K4VD
In reply to this post by wayne burdick
​For me, portable operations went from a rare, scheduled event requiring a
team of people and equipment to a small Nikon camera bag that fits in a
corner of a bag on my motorcycle. In other words, it went from a chore to a
joy.
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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Phil Wheeler-2
In reply to this post by wayne burdick
Mine was from the Blue Mountains in NW Oregon in
1955. ARC-V gear powered via a dynamotor.

Those were NOT the good old days :-)

Phil W7OX

On 10/4/16 9:36 AM, Wayne Burdick wrote:

> My first attempt to operate from a campsite was in 1972, when I was 14. My dad chuckled as I hefted my box of gear into the camper. At the time I had no battery powered radios. The receiver was a Heathkit HR-10B. The transmitter was a 3-tube, 10-watt, WW2 CW monstrosity I borrowed from someone in the El Cajon ARC. I also didn't have an antenna tuner, so I brought a full-size 40-m dipole with #18 wire and 100' of RG58. Keyer was a Heath HD-10.
>
> Our campsite in Utah didn't have an electrical outlet. Fortunately I had a very long extension cord that I routed through the window of the  men's room, two campsites down. I had to apologize to hostile strangers as I wove the cord through bushes and around cars.
>
> Getting the heavy dipole up into the ponderosas required rope, rocks, and a few swear words I hadn't used in front of my parents prior to that time.
>
> Finally, I was on the air. Unfortunately the band wasn't particularly open that day, and I think I ended up making three contacts. Still, I got The Bug.
>
> These days, I use a KX2, two lengths of #26 wire, an earbud/mic, and a KXPD2 paddle. Total station weight: 2 lbs, counting the CS40 bag. Setup time: 2 or 3 minutes, depending on how many times it takes to hit just the right branch with a 1 ounce stainless steel weight. Or 1 minute if I'm using a whip.
>
> It's been a wild journey that I suppose could be graphed in terms of miles per watt per pound over 40 years.
>
> I bet there a few other variations on this theme....
>
> 73,
> Wayne
> N6KR

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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

k6mkf
In reply to this post by wayne burdick
My first real portable operation wasn't really camping at all.   I was on
Maui at a condo with a switching power supply, an IC-7000 and a 20M dipole.
My wife would bring me out cold Coronas and I had a blast working my buddies
on the mainland as KH6/K6MKF.  

https://www.icloud.com/iphoto/projects/#08;CAEQARoQbdL1Gz3QdtRohgj8O_vXyg;D5
A845C0-5AD7-4715-A0CF-23CB4F01C337

The KX3 and the KX2 are intriguing and Christmas is coming ... ;>)

- 73 and good DX de Mike, K6MKF, Past President - NCDXC

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Elecraft [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of
Wayne
> Burdick
> Sent: Tuesday, October 04, 2016 9:37 AM
> To: Elecraft <[hidden email]>; KX3 <[hidden email]>
> Subject: [Elecraft] Camping radio ops: then and now ...

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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Bill Frantz
On my first portable operation, I put my Small Wonders Labs
PSK-20 (a 20M 5W transceiver fixed tuned to the PSK subband), a
MacBook, a SignaLink, a battery, a dipole, and a Thermarester
portable chair into a backpack and hiked about a mile up into
the Sierra Azul open space district above Los Gatos, CA.

I found a lovely site overlooking the valley with trees giving
me about 15' elevation for the dipole. I had a fun afternoon
making PSK contacts.

73 Bill AE6JV

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(408)356-8506      |not an add-on feature. - Attr-| 16345
Englewood Ave
www.pwpconsult.com |ibuted to Andrew Tanenbaum    | Los Gatos,
CA 95032

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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Dave KW4M
In reply to this post by wayne burdick
Not counting Field Day outings with the local club, my first camping radio excursions were with a Heathkit HW-104 powered from a gel-cell battery about the same size as a car battery.  Needless to say, I didn't set up camp too far away from the car!  But it was rather nice to have a battery-powered all-solid-state rig without needing a step-up switching supply for a tube radio.

A few years later I homebrewed a transceiver with camping as a primary goal, see here.  This was a major step forward in convenience with a high fun factor.

Now I usually just carry along the KX2 in a small pack.  The antenna varies, but most often I use a 20 meter inverted V suspended from a cord tossed up into a tree.

73,
Dave


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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

K9MA
In reply to this post by K9MA
Hi John,

Links to regulator and tuner schematics:

http://sdellington.us/hr/KX-1_regulator4.pdf

http://sdellington.us/hr/EFHW_Tuner2.pdf

  A couple notes:

I had some trouble with the LT1965 regulator oscillating, probably due
to the lead inductance of the leaded (non-smt) capacitor I used, hence
the LC network.  The MIC29150 regulator data sheet claims it works with
all capacitors, though I haven't tried it. If the MIC29150 is used, the
LC network is replaced with a short. The way I wired the regulator to
the KX1 required cutting a trace on the PWB, so the power could be
switched ahead of the regulator.  This prevents the regulator from
discharging  the battery when the KX1 is off.  If you prefer not to cut
the trace, you could wire the batteries to the regulator input through a
connector, and just unplug that connector when you're not using the KX1.

The tuner is based on the Pacific Antenna BLT+, using most of the same
parts.  I bought the BLT+ kit without the case, replaced the
transformer, and put it in my own box.  The kit includes the N7VE SWR
bridge.  Note that my version is only intended to match end fed half
wave multiples, with impedances from about 1,000 to 6,000 Ohms, and it's
strictly QRP.

73,

Scott  K9MA


On 10/4/2016 13:04, John Ellsworth wrote:

> Scott - I also have KX1. I have not taken it on bike trip yet, but it
> does come along in the camper a lot.
>
> I'd be interested in the details of your regulator and tuner.  Thanks
> for posting the note in the forum.
>
> 73 de JohnE/kd0nqc
>
> On 10/04/2016 11:54 AM, K9MA wrote:
>> For what it's worth, here's my recent solution for bicycle portable
>> operation:
>>
>> http://cwt1605k9ma.blogspot.com/2016/08/equipment.html
>>
>> It weighs a bit more than Wayne's station, but I don't need trees to
>> hold the antenna up.
>>
>>
>> 73,
>>
>> Scott  K9MA
>>
>>


--
Scott  K9MA

[hidden email]

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Camping Radio Ops: Then and Now

Edward A. Dauer
In reply to this post by wayne burdick
I don’t recall anything particularly interesting from my hamming youth;  but the most vivid memory of portable ops came in 1973 in a Fiat 124 where I had mounted an HW-101 and its power supply in the already-cramped passenger footwell.  As part of the effort to squelch the awful ignition noise, I decided I would put ordinary coax braid around all of the plug wires and ground it to the engine block and the frame.  

About a month in I had a chance to meet a prospective client – the senior VP of a California bank -- and drive him to a meeting of his trade association.  

He found the HW-101 hitting his legs somewhere between amusing and annoying.  And then the car stopped.  In the center lane of the Hollywood Freeway where, if I remember it right, it narrows and goes through Cahuenga pass.  We alone were keeping 300,000 other drivers from getting home to the Valley in time for dinner.  The prospective client sat in the car with his feet hitting the HW-101 as I tore all the braid off the plug wires trying to restore the shorted distributor.  He was no longer amused.  He was, from a business point of view, fatally annoyed.

A KX2 if available at the time could have effected a career-altering change.

Ted, KN1CBR

------------------------------
   
    Message: 22
    Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2016 09:36:32 -0700
    From: Wayne Burdick <[hidden email]>
    To: Elecraft <[hidden email]>, KX3 <[hidden email]>
    Subject: [Elecraft] Camping radio ops: then and now
    Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
   
    My first attempt to operate from a campsite was in 1972, when I was 14. My dad chuckled as I hefted my box of gear into the camper. At the time I had no battery powered radios. The receiver was a Heathkit HR-10B. The transmitter was a 3-tube, 10-watt, WW2 CW monstrosity I borrowed from someone in the El Cajon ARC. I also didn't have an antenna tuner, so I brought a full-size 40-m dipole with #18 wire and 100' of RG58. Keyer was a Heath HD-10.
   
    Our campsite in Utah didn't have an electrical outlet. Fortunately I had a very long extension cord that I routed through the window of the  men's room, two campsites down. I had to apologize to hostile strangers as I wove the cord through bushes and around cars.
   
    Getting the heavy dipole up into the ponderosas required rope, rocks, and a few swear words I hadn't used in front of my parents prior to that time.
   
    Finally, I was on the air. Unfortunately the band wasn't particularly open that day, and I think I ended up making three contacts. Still, I got The Bug.
   
    These days, I use a KX2, two lengths of #26 wire, an earbud/mic, and a KXPD2 paddle. Total station weight: 2 lbs, counting the CS40 bag. Setup time: 2 or 3 minutes, depending on how many times it takes to hit just the right branch with a 1 ounce stainless steel weight. Or 1 minute if I'm using a whip.
   
    It's been a wild journey that I suppose could be graphed in terms of miles per watt per pound over 40 years.
   
    I bet there a few other variations on this theme....
   
    73,
    Wayne
    N6KR
   
   
   
 

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Re: Camping Radio Ops: Then and Now

Wes Stewart-2
Your first mistake was buying the Fiat.  Everything went downhill from there:-)

On 10/4/2016 4:37 PM, Dauer, Edward wrote:
> I don’t recall anything particularly interesting from my hamming youth;  but the most vivid memory of portable ops came in 1973 in a Fiat 124

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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Mike Morrow-3
In reply to this post by wayne burdick
Around 1960 to 1962, on my family's tent camping trips to remote locations in the Arkansas Ozarks, I would help my dad set up his Drake 2-A receiver, Multi-Elmac AF-67 AM transmitter, and 80m dipole in the trees.  Power was from a military surplus 120 vac 300 watt generator (run only if no body was camped nearby).

When I got out of the Navy 37 years ago, I immediately returned to Arkansas campsite ham ops with the new TS-120S, MFJ tuner, and deep-discharge battery.  (Most of the areas my family had camped years earlier had become the Buffalo National River.  I return there every Fall that circumstances allow.)  This type of ham operations will always be my favorite use of radio.

My now-defunct K1 had been my principal camp rig since 2001.  I'd like to replace it with a KX2 immediately.  But the KX2 has no schematics for the customer, so that prevents my purchase.

Mike / KK5F
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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Phil Wheeler-2
Why "But the KX2 has no schematics for the
customer, so that prevents my purchase.", Mike?  
Mine works just fine, without schematics.

Phil W7OX

On 10/5/16 5:37 PM, Mike Morrow wrote:
> Around 1960 to 1962, on my family's tent camping trips to remote locations in the Arkansas Ozarks, I would help my dad set up his Drake 2-A receiver, Multi-Elmac AF-67 AM transmitter, and 80m dipole in the trees.  Power was from a military surplus 120 vac 300 watt generator (run only if no body was camped nearby).
>
> When I got out of the Navy 37 years ago, I immediately returned to Arkansas campsite ham ops with the new TS-120S, MFJ tuner, and deep-discharge battery.  (Most of the areas my family had camped years earlier had become the Buffalo National River.  I return there every Fall that circumstances allow.)  This type of ham operations will always be my favorite use of radio.
>
> My now-defunct K1 had been my principal camp rig since 2001.  I'd like to replace it with a KX2 immediately.  But the KX2 has no schematics for the customer, so that prevents my purchase.
>
> Mike / KK5F

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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

vk2rq
Source code is too low level to get a conceptual understanding of what the software is doing -- a software architecture diagram is likely to be more useful for that. (in a similar way, for hardware a schematic diagram abstracts out implementation details such as PCB layout and track routing to make it clearer how the circuit works at a conceptual level).

73, Matt VK2RQ




On Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 11:59 AM +1100, "Walter Underwood" <[hidden email]> wrote:










These days, the source code matters as much as the schematic. Want to find the Weaver SSB demodulator? That is in software.

wunder
K6WRU
Walter Underwood
CM87wj
http://observer.wunderwood.org/ (my blog)

> On Oct 5, 2016, at 5:43 PM, Phil Wheeler  wrote:
>
> Why "But the KX2 has no schematics for the customer, so that prevents my purchase.", Mike?  Mine works just fine, without schematics.
>
> Phil W7OX
>
> On 10/5/16 5:37 PM, Mike Morrow wrote:
>> Around 1960 to 1962, on my family's tent camping trips to remote locations in the Arkansas Ozarks, I would help my dad set up his Drake 2-A receiver, Multi-Elmac AF-67 AM transmitter, and 80m dipole in the trees.  Power was from a military surplus 120 vac 300 watt generator (run only if no body was camped nearby).
>>
>> When I got out of the Navy 37 years ago, I immediately returned to Arkansas campsite ham ops with the new TS-120S, MFJ tuner, and deep-discharge battery.  (Most of the areas my family had camped years earlier had become the Buffalo National River.  I return there every Fall that circumstances allow.)  This type of ham operations will always be my favorite use of radio.
>>
>> My now-defunct K1 had been my principal camp rig since 2001.  I'd like to replace it with a KX2 immediately.  But the KX2 has no schematics for the customer, so that prevents my purchase.
>>
>> Mike / KK5F
>
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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Mike Morrow-3
In reply to this post by wayne burdick
Phil wrote:

> Why "But the KX2 has no schematics for the
> customer, so that prevents my purchase.", Mike?  
> Mine works just fine, without schematics.

It's just a matter of principal, Phil.  I've never in almost 49 years a ham purchased HF gear that did not, at minimum, include the schematics.  I'm a retired electrical engineer for whom knowing a little about what's inside the box is actually **much more important** than knowing how to operate the box.  

I accept that firmware will always be shrouded and proprietary.  For the hardware, if the complete (though not wholly current) KX3 system schematics can released, it is hard to understand why the same hasn't happened for the simpler KX2 system.

Mine is unpopular philosophy today, when ham gear is becoming more and more like smartphones whose internal workings are shielded from the view of the vulgar mob.  (For my phones, I get as much info as I can from the FCC OET Device Listings ... even for Bluetooth headsets!)

I just did not expect Elecraft to adopt that attitude.  :-)

73,
Mike / KK5F

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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

vk2rq
In reply to this post by vk2rq
The block diagram you linked to is for hardware only; it is not a software functional block diagram.
If you are interested specifically in the noise reduction, the source code for the K2's NR is open source. I imagine Lyle would have adopted a similar sort of approach for KX3/K3.
73, Matt VK2RQ

                _____________________________
From: Walter Underwood <[hidden email]>
Sent: Thursday, October 6, 2016 1:09 pm
Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Camping radio ops: then and now
To: Elecraft Reflector <[hidden email]>, Matt Maguire <[hidden email]>


I was writing software for radios in 1981. Diagrams might help understanding, but the source code is the equivalent to a schematic. We already have a block diagram for the KX3 and people keep complaining.
http://www.elecraft.com/manual/KX3%20Manual%20Block%20Diagram.pdf
I’m still pretty danged curious about the noise reduction. I think it is based on a Kalman filter with the “known signal” input generated from a lowpass-filtered or averaged version of the input. But I won’t figure that out from the block diagram. So, not useful to me.

wunder
K6WRUWalter Underwood
CM87wjhttp://observer.wunderwood.org/ (my blog)
On Oct 5, 2016, at 6:20 PM, Matt Maguire <[hidden email]> wrote:
Source code is too low level to get a conceptual understanding of what the software is doing -- a software architecture diagram is likely to be more useful for that. (in a similar way, for hardware a schematic diagram abstracts out implementation details such as PCB layout and track routing to make it clearer how the circuit works at a conceptual level).

73, Matt VK2RQ



On Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 11:59 AM +1100, "Walter Underwood" <[hidden email]> wrote:

These days, the source code matters as much as the schematic. Want to find the Weaver SSB demodulator? That is in software.wunderK6WRUWalter UnderwoodCM87wjhttp://observer.wunderwood.org/ (my blog)> On Oct 5, 2016, at 5:43 PM, Phil Wheeler  wrote:> > Why "But the KX2 has no schematics for the customer, so that prevents my purchase.", Mike?  Mine works just fine, without schematics.> > Phil W7OX> > On 10/5/16 5:37 PM, Mike Morrow wrote:>> Around 1960 to 1962, on my family's tent camping trips to remote locations in the Arkansas Ozarks, I would help my dad set up his Drake 2-A receiver, Multi-Elmac AF-67 AM transmitter, and 80m dipole in the trees.  Power was from a military surplus 120 vac 300 watt generator (run only if no body was camped nearby).>> >> When I got out of the Navy 37 years ago, I immediately returned to Arkansas campsite ham ops with the new TS-120S, MFJ tuner, and deep-discharge battery.  (Most of the areas my family had camped years earlier had become the Buffalo National River.  I return there every Fall that circumstances allow.)  This type of ham operations will always be my favorite use of radio.>> >> My now-defunct K1 had been my principal camp rig since 2001.  I'd like to replace it with a KX2 immediately.  But the KX2 has no schematics for the customer, so that prevents my purchase.>> >> Mike / KK5F> > ______________________________________________________________> Elecraft mailing list> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm> Post: mailto:[hidden email]> > This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html> Message delivered to wunder@wunderwood.org______________________________________________________________Elecraft mailing listHome: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraftHelp: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htmPost: mailto:[hidden email] list hosted by: http://www.qsl.netPlease help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.htmlMessage delivered to [hidden email]



       
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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Jim Brown-10
In reply to this post by Mike Morrow-3
Mike,

I completely agree with your position. I suspect that Elecraft having
not yet published a schematic is simply a matter of time. Schematics for
most, if not all, of their products have been published, and the later
ones (K3 and later) are on their website as pdf files.

DX Engineering does not publish any of their schematics. K3LR , who I
consider a good guy, runs that company, and  I've let him know what I
think about that policy.

73, Jim K9YC

On Wed,10/5/2016 9:08 PM, Mike Morrow wrote:
> It's just a matter of principal, Phil.  I've never in almost 49 years a ham purchased HF gear that did not, at minimum, include the schematics.  I'm a retired electrical engineer for whom knowing a little about what's inside the box is actually **much more important** than knowing how to operate the box.


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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

Holger Schurig-2
In reply to this post by Mike Morrow-3
> it is hard to understand why the same hasn't happened for the simpler
> KX2 system.

If I recall it right, the schematics of the KX3 wasn't released
immediately after the radio, it took more than a year.


Holger
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Re: Camping radio ops: then and now

gm3sek
In reply to this post by Mike Morrow-3
I strongly agree, Mike - especially with that last sentence, "I just did
not expect Elecraft to adopt that attitude."

The K3 schematics were published shortly after the release of the K3
itself and have proved invaluable. They have saved me literally hundreds
of dollars in return shipping costs for repairs that - thanks to having
the schematics - turned out to be very minor and easily done at home.

Fast forward to last year when, as an early adopter of the K3S, I was
very disappointed to hear afterwards that the schematics would not be
published. Having already had to repair the K3S more than once using the
old K3 schematics, I can tell you that was no fun at all!

Same as Mike, that was not the deal I'd had thought I was buying into.

We have a saying in Scotland that "someone needs to have a word with
himself" about this.


73 from Ian GM3SEK


>-----Original Message-----
>From: Elecraft [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of
>Mike Morrow
>Sent: 06 October 2016 05:08
>To: Elecraft Reflector
>Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Camping radio ops: then and now
>
>Phil wrote:
>
>> Why "But the KX2 has no schematics for the
>> customer, so that prevents my purchase.", Mike?
>> Mine works just fine, without schematics.
>
>It's just a matter of principal, Phil.  I've never in almost 49 years a
ham
>purchased HF gear that did not, at minimum, include the schematics.
I'm a
>retired electrical engineer for whom knowing a little about what's
inside the
>box is actually **much more important** than knowing how to operate the
>box.
>
>I accept that firmware will always be shrouded and proprietary.  For
the
>hardware, if the complete (though not wholly current) KX3 system
>schematics can released, it is hard to understand why the same hasn't
>happened for the simpler KX2 system.
>
>Mine is unpopular philosophy today, when ham gear is becoming more and
>more like smartphones whose internal workings are shielded from the
view
>of the vulgar mob.  (For my phones, I get as much info as I can from
the FCC
>OET Device Listings ... even for Bluetooth headsets!)
>
>I just did not expect Elecraft to adopt that attitude.  :-)
>
>73,
>Mike / KK5F


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