Copying CW at high speeds

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Copying CW at high speeds

Jim Danehy
The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast speed.

The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about 670,616,629 mph.

My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is giving you a choice of words to choose from.

The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the context of the message. I don’t know why this occurs. But it does.

So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.

When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.

It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.

It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.

73
Jim
W9VNE / VA3VNE




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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Kevin McQuiggin (SFU)
It does not negate the argument, but nerve impulses are based on chemical reactions in neurons, and only travel at about 120 metres per second.

> On Dec 28, 2019, at 7:16 PM, Jim Danehy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast speed.
>
> The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about 670,616,629 mph.
>
> My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is giving you a choice of words to choose from.
>
> The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the context of the message. I don’t know why this occurs. But it does.
>
> So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.
>
> When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.
>
> It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.
>
> It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.
>
> 73
> Jim
> W9VNE / VA3VNE
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
> Message delivered to [hidden email]

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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Elecraft mailing list
In reply to this post by Jim Danehy
Jim...

I am curious about which "... things do occur..." that help along the
QRQ way.

Thanks for your interesting thoughts.

...robert

On 12/29/2019 03:16, Jim Danehy wrote:

> The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast speed.
>
> The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about 670,616,629 mph.
>
> My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is giving you a choice of words to choose from.
>
> The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the context of the message. I don’t know why this occurs. But it does.
>
> So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.
>
> When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.
>
> It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.
>
> It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.
>
> 73
> Jim
> W9VNE / VA3VNE
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> ______________________________________________________________
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> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
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> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
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> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>

--
Robert G Strickland, PhD ABPH - KE2WY
[hidden email]
Syracuse, New York, USA
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Eric J
For one, trhee is a lot of rdannudcey in lngugaae. Yuor biarn tkeas advgaante of taht. You cn'at wenn you can olny wrtie dwon leettr by leettr.

When you head copy words, even short phrases, your brain does a lot of the work it already knows how to do. That first sentence would take a lot of work trying to figure it out letter by letter, but most people can scan it for sense almost as fast as they can read correct text.

Eric KE6UWS

On 12/28/2019 7:43 PM, Robert G Strickland via Elecraft wrote:
Jim...

I am curious about which "... things do occur..." that help along the QRQ way.

Thanks for your interesting thoughts.

...robert

On 12/29/2019 03:16, Jim Danehy wrote:
The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast speed.

The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about 670,616,629 mph.

My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is giving you a choice of words to choose from.

The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the context of the message. I don’t know why this occurs. But it does.

So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.

When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.

It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.

It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.

73
Jim
W9VNE / VA3VNE




Sent from my iPhone
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

K2bew
In reply to this post by Jim Danehy
Jim I really appreciate your long explanations of learning to improve CW.
Thanks so much!
73,
Tom Bewick, k2bew

On Sat, Dec 28, 2019, 22:17 Jim Danehy <[hidden email]> wrote:

> The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast
> speed.
>
> The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about
> 670,616,629 mph.
>
> My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not
> encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a
> common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed
> Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is
> giving you a choice of words to choose from.
>
> The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the
> context of the message. I don’t know why this occurs. But it does.
>
> So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the
> phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a
> curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.
>
> When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have
> assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I
> only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.
>
> It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.
>
> It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things
> do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ
> CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.
>
> 73
> Jim
> W9VNE / VA3VNE
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
> Message delivered to [hidden email]
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

NK7Z
Nerve impulses travel at around 200 MPH, tops, but I believe the
explanation will still hold.

73, and thanks,
Dave (NK7Z)
https://www.nk7z.net
ARRL Volunteer Examiner
ARRL Technical Specialist
ARRL Asst. Director, NW Division, Technical Resources

On 12/28/19 10:16 PM, K2bew wrote:

> Jim I really appreciate your long explanations of learning to improve CW.
> Thanks so much!
> 73,
> Tom Bewick, k2bew
>
> On Sat, Dec 28, 2019, 22:17 Jim Danehy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast
>> speed.
>>
>> The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about
>> 670,616,629 mph.
>>
>> My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not
>> encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a
>> common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed
>> Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is
>> giving you a choice of words to choose from.
>>
>> The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the
>> context of the message. I don’t know why this occurs. But it does.
>>
>> So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the
>> phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a
>> curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.
>>
>> When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have
>> assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I
>> only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.
>>
>> It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.
>>
>> It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things
>> do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ
>> CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.
>>
>> 73
>> Jim
>> W9VNE / VA3VNE
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>
>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
> ______________________________________________________________
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

David Woolley (E.L)
In reply to this post by Kevin McQuiggin (SFU)
Neve conduction is actually a mixture of chemical and electrical
mechanisms, in vertebrates.  The signal travels electrically in short
hops, and is then regenerated by a chemical process.  Invertebrates have
propagation velocities of more like 1 metre / second.
<http://www.biologymad.com/NervousSystem/nerveimpulses.htm#impulsespeed>

--
David Woolley

On 29/12/2019 03:27, Kevin McQuiggin wrote:
> It does not negate the argument, but nerve impulses are based on chemical reactions in neurons, and only travel at about 120 metres per second.

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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Barry
While I agree with the OP about copying conversational QRQ, the
redundancy/anticipation doesn't hold true when copying callsigns, such as in
the case of running RUFZ.

I don't know if the number has gone up in the last ~10 years, as that was
the last time I participated in the IARU HST, but at that time, 2 guys
(DJ1YFK and YT7AW) broke 200 WPM.  When in my prime, I hit about 120 WPM
running RUFZ.  200 sounds like a buzz saw to me.  Maybe these guys have
narrower gaps in their synapses?

Barry W2UP (HST 2011 Bronze medal in RUFZ)



--
Sent from: http://elecraft.365791.n2.nabble.com/
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

K8TE
In reply to this post by Eric J
CW scared me to death after my traumatic experience with the FCC in Syracuse
NY in 1960.  I had only several weeks to practice since I had been in HK4 as
an exchange student for a long Summer where I operated SSB on a friend's
DX-100 and HQ-170.  I passed the General, but probably with one or no
characters to spare.  At 14 years old, that made a lasting impression!

With the advent of vanity calls, I chose to dump WA8WWM for K8TE in the
mid-1970s.  I also passed  the 1st Class Radiotelephone in Detroit and the
2nd Class Radiotelegraph exam in Lubbock a couple years later.  I though the
plain text for the latter was 22 wpm and cypher groups at 18.  It was a long
time ago.

CW for me went by the wayside until FD 2012 when I had to fill-in an empty
two-hour CW slot, I the SSB Team captain.  With trepidation, I started
running.  With about 150 calls in the log, I decided it was possible to
operate CW and not achieve a higher heart beat than QSO rate.

Since then, I have used LCWO.net for callsign practice.  I can copy at 75%
accuracy above 40 wpm now.  I have a friend who listens to CW at the gym or
on the road and has improved his speed significantly.  I have yet to feel a
desire to rag chew.  But I can easily copy my callsign in DX pileups well
above the infrequent 35 wpm speed.  I am proof that practice matters a lot!

My purpose is to encourage the synapses to transfer callsigns and exchanges
from sound to the keyboard.  I don't have time to rag chew in CW and rarely
find time for extended SSB QSO's.  Still, I really enjoy chasing DX, POTA,
SOTA, Counties, contesting, etc., especially on CW where contacts (usually)
are brief and to the point, to say nothing of the difference in FD (no
"Please Copy", Bill, AE6JV).

Happy New Year and 73, Bill, K8TE



--
Sent from: http://elecraft.365791.n2.nabble.com/
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Kenneth Schoenlein
In reply to this post by Jim Danehy
When learning CW in the military graduating speed was copying five letter coded groups at 25 wpm. You also had to learn typing on a mill at comparable speeds. You usually had code class then typing class on a mill. Chattanooga Shoe Shine Boy and similar tunes were played to teach you cadence in typing. With that background it is difficult to lay back and copy in your head. But I am doing it and learning to just worry about the call sign, location, frequency and time. To new comers, I say, copy in your head and as mentioned in other posts here learn cw as a language. But please, do not send faster than you can receive.

> On Dec 29, 2019, at 5:17 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>
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> Today's Topics:
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>   1. Re: Copying CW at high speeds (Robert G Strickland)
>   2. Re: Copying CW at high speeds (Eric J)
>   3. Re: Learning Morse Code (Tom McCulloch)
>   4. Re: Learning Morse Code (David Bunte)
>   5. Re: Copying CW at high speeds (K2bew)
>   6. Re: Copying CW at high speeds (Dave Cole)
>   7. Re: Learning Morse Code (Jim Brown)
>   8. Re: Copying CW at high speeds (David Woolley)
>   9. Re: Copying CW at high speeds (Barry)
>  10. Re: Learning Morse Code (Barry)
>  11. Re: K3 - Power cable voltage drop (Don Wilhelm)
>  12. 50 ohm SMD Dummy Load Kit (Richard Thorne)
>  13. My K3/100 has been sold ([hidden email])
>  14. CW skimmer (Morgan Bailey)
>  15. kx3 FOR SALE (Terry Basom)
>  16. Re: CW skimmer (Don Wilhelm)
>  17. Re: Copying CW at high speeds (OT to Elecraft) (Mike Morrow)
>  18. Re: 50 ohm SMD Dummy Load Kit ([hidden email])
>  19. KPA 1500 and receiver noise (K0RKH)
>  20. Re: K3 - KEY OUT problem (M. George)
>  21. Re: Learning Morse Code (Fred Jensen)
>  22. Re: Copying CW at high speeds (OT to Elecraft) (Phil Kane)
>  23. Elecraft SSB net for Sunday December29, 2019 (Jim White NC0JW)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 03:43:46 +0000
> From: Robert G Strickland <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> Jim...
>
> I am curious about which "... things do occur..." that help along the
> QRQ way.
>
> Thanks for your interesting thoughts.
>
> ...robert
>
> On 12/29/2019 03:16, Jim Danehy wrote:
>> The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast speed.
>>
>> The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about 670,616,629 mph.
>>
>> My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is giving you a choice of words to choose from.
>>
>> The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the context of the message. I don?t know why this occurs. But it does.
>>
>> So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.
>>
>> When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.
>>
>> It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.
>>
>> It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.
>>
>> 73
>> Jim
>> W9VNE / VA3VNE
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>
>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>>
>
> --
> Robert G Strickland, PhD ABPH - KE2WY
> [hidden email]
> Syracuse, New York, USA
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 04:07:28 +0000
> From: Eric J <[hidden email]>
> To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds
> Message-ID:
> <[hidden email]>
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> For one, trhee is a lot of rdannudcey in lngugaae. Yuor biarn tkeas advgaante of taht. You cn'at wenn you can olny wrtie dwon leettr by leettr.
>
> When you head copy words, even short phrases, your brain does a lot of the work it already knows how to do. That first sentence would take a lot of work trying to figure it out letter by letter, but most people can scan it for sense almost as fast as they can read correct text.
>
> Eric KE6UWS
>
> On 12/28/2019 7:43 PM, Robert G Strickland via Elecraft wrote:
> Jim...
>
> I am curious about which "... things do occur..." that help along the QRQ way.
>
> Thanks for your interesting thoughts.
>
> ...robert
>
> On 12/29/2019 03:16, Jim Danehy wrote:
> The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast speed.
>
> The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about 670,616,629 mph.
>
> My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is giving you a choice of words to choose from.
>
> The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the context of the message. I don?t know why this occurs. But it does.
>
> So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.
>
> When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.
>
> It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.
>
> It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.
>
> 73
> Jim
> W9VNE / VA3VNE
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
> Message delivered to [hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Sat, 28 Dec 2019 23:25:25 -0500
> From: Tom McCulloch <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Learning Morse Code
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> I agree, we all learn by the method our Elmer taught us.? Mine was the
> A,W,J method at 5 WPM.
>
> I've been a CW guys almost exclusively and found 15 wpm to be my
> personal comfort zone...However I have a question for those higher speed
> guys out there.? At what speed would you say you start hearing complete
> words rather than the individual letters and as a result you could
> pretty much copy in your head (Jim said he doesn't write anything over
> 20 WPM).? To me that's aweome (also unachievable..hi)
>
> Thanks
>
> Tom WB2QDG
>
> K2 # 1103 (I think)
>
> On 12/28/2019 12:08 PM, Jim Danehy wrote:
>> Everyone has an opinion on how to learn Morse Code. My skill with CW probably comes from longevity. Closing in on 70 years of using Morse Code. Certainly mostly hit and miss. I once wrote here that I could copy quite fast. Then the posts of bragging. That was not my intention. Credibility counts. You establish that with facts.
>>
>> We all start with a blank sheet. We learned to talk as babies. That takes a good year plus. There really is no difference between learning to decode speech and CW. They both are sounds. They both are methods of communication. Reflect on that for just a moment or two.
>>
>> Converting sound ! When I hear 2 people conversing in a language that I do not know it is just sound. That also occurs when CW is heard by someone who does not know CW.
>>
>> A baby does not learn to read for about 5 years after they learn to converse in a language. That is why I do not recommend using sight to learn CW. You may disagree.
>>
>> I can not recall how long ago it was but I do not write down CW. I do not write down my conversations in spoken language.
>>
>> Most people learn CW at slow speeds. They need to write so that they can retain what the sender is attempting to communicate. At 5 wpm you would lose the flow of the attempted conversation unless you made notes.
>>
>> So writing is OK at slower speeds. The goal is to increase your speed to a point where you do not lose what the conversation is about. That occurs differently for all of us. I would opine that above 20 wpm you should wean yourself off of writing down what you are hearing.
>>
>> The ARRL  has archived their Code Practice files that have been sent over the air. They start at 5 wpm. The increase in 5 words per minute I recall. They go up to 40  wpm too. They are archived in MP3 format. They also have a companion text file. Check their website.
>>
>> It took me a long time to reach where I find myself today. In the 1st paragraph I wrote 70 years. Yes I am going to be 82. All I use is CW. I have software that allows me to convert text to CW. I have a library of MP 3 files that start at 40 and go up to 60. I practice several times a month. At QRQ Speeds you learn to copy entire words.
>> Most can not copy QRQ but that is just a fact. It takes practice. I believe using the ARRL archives a normal Ham should be able to reach copying 20 wpm in a few months. Get rid of the pencil and paper at some point. You don?t converse with others writing down what you hear from someone. If a baby can learn to talk in a year you can do CW at 20 in a year.
>>
>> Just do it
>>
>> 73
>> Jim W9VNE/VA3VNE
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>
>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Sat, 28 Dec 2019 23:45:59 -0500
> From: David Bunte <[hidden email]>
> To: Tom McCulloch <[hidden email]>
> Cc: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Learning Morse Code
> Message-ID:
> <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Tom -
>
> I can't handle the higher speeds at which Jim is comfortable, but his
> suggestions are excellent. I think I stopped writing down stuff by the time
> I approached 15 wpm... except, of course Callsigns, names and QTH because I
> wanted those in my log... sometimes I will make other notes in the log to
> recall in future QSOs. By the time I got to 20 WPM I had to look for a
> paper and pencil if I wanted to write something down... as I put all the
> other stuff right into my logging program.
>
> Just getting on the air and making QSOs has helped my speed more than
> anything else. Finding someone with whom to chew the rag... not only helps
> code speed, I think it makes the hobby even more enjoyable.
>
> Best of luck es 73 de Dave - K9FN
>
> On Sat, Dec 28, 2019 at 11:26 PM Tom McCulloch <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> I agree, we all learn by the method our Elmer taught us.  Mine was the
>> A,W,J method at 5 WPM.
>>
>> I've been a CW guys almost exclusively and found 15 wpm to be my
>> personal comfort zone...However I have a question for those higher speed
>> guys out there.  At what speed would you say you start hearing complete
>> words rather than the individual letters and as a result you could
>> pretty much copy in your head (Jim said he doesn't write anything over
>> 20 WPM).  To me that's aweome (also unachievable..hi)
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Tom WB2QDG
>>
>> K2 # 1103 (I think)
>>
>> On 12/28/2019 12:08 PM, Jim Danehy wrote:
>>> Everyone has an opinion on how to learn Morse Code. My skill with CW
>> probably comes from longevity. Closing in on 70 years of using Morse Code.
>> Certainly mostly hit and miss. I once wrote here that I could copy quite
>> fast. Then the posts of bragging. That was not my intention. Credibility
>> counts. You establish that with facts.
>>>
>>> We all start with a blank sheet. We learned to talk as babies. That
>> takes a good year plus. There really is no difference between learning to
>> decode speech and CW. They both are sounds. They both are methods of
>> communication. Reflect on that for just a moment or two.
>>>
>>> Converting sound ! When I hear 2 people conversing in a language that I
>> do not know it is just sound. That also occurs when CW is heard by someone
>> who does not know CW.
>>>
>>> A baby does not learn to read for about 5 years after they learn to
>> converse in a language. That is why I do not recommend using sight to learn
>> CW. You may disagree.
>>>
>>> I can not recall how long ago it was but I do not write down CW. I do
>> not write down my conversations in spoken language.
>>>
>>> Most people learn CW at slow speeds. They need to write so that they can
>> retain what the sender is attempting to communicate. At 5 wpm you would
>> lose the flow of the attempted conversation unless you made notes.
>>>
>>> So writing is OK at slower speeds. The goal is to increase your speed to
>> a point where you do not lose what the conversation is about. That occurs
>> differently for all of us. I would opine that above 20 wpm you should wean
>> yourself off of writing down what you are hearing.
>>>
>>> The ARRL  has archived their Code Practice files that have been sent
>> over the air. They start at 5 wpm. The increase in 5 words per minute I
>> recall. They go up to 40  wpm too. They are archived in MP3 format. They
>> also have a companion text file. Check their website.
>>>
>>> It took me a long time to reach where I find myself today. In the 1st
>> paragraph I wrote 70 years. Yes I am going to be 82. All I use is CW. I
>> have software that allows me to convert text to CW. I have a library of MP
>> 3 files that start at 40 and go up to 60. I practice several times a month.
>> At QRQ Speeds you learn to copy entire words.
>>> Most can not copy QRQ but that is just a fact. It takes practice. I
>> believe using the ARRL archives a normal Ham should be able to reach
>> copying 20 wpm in a few months. Get rid of the pencil and paper at some
>> point. You don?t converse with others writing down what you hear from
>> someone. If a baby can learn to talk in a year you can do CW at 20 in a
>> year.
>>>
>>> Just do it
>>>
>>> 73
>>> Jim W9VNE/VA3VNE
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> ______________________________________________________________
>>> Elecraft mailing list
>>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>>
>>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>
>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 01:16:53 -0500
> From: K2bew <[hidden email]>
> Cc: Elecraft Mailing List <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds
> Message-ID:
> <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Jim I really appreciate your long explanations of learning to improve CW.
> Thanks so much!
> 73,
> Tom Bewick, k2bew
>
> On Sat, Dec 28, 2019, 22:17 Jim Danehy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast
>> speed.
>>
>> The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about
>> 670,616,629 mph.
>>
>> My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not
>> encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a
>> common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed
>> Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is
>> giving you a choice of words to choose from.
>>
>> The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the
>> context of the message. I don?t know why this occurs. But it does.
>>
>> So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the
>> phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a
>> curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.
>>
>> When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have
>> assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I
>> only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.
>>
>> It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.
>>
>> It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things
>> do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ
>> CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.
>>
>> 73
>> Jim
>> W9VNE / VA3VNE
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>
>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Sat, 28 Dec 2019 22:20:51 -0800
> From: Dave Cole <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> Nerve impulses travel at around 200 MPH, tops, but I believe the
> explanation will still hold.
>
> 73, and thanks,
> Dave (NK7Z)
> https://www.nk7z.net
> ARRL Volunteer Examiner
> ARRL Technical Specialist
> ARRL Asst. Director, NW Division, Technical Resources
>
> On 12/28/19 10:16 PM, K2bew wrote:
>> Jim I really appreciate your long explanations of learning to improve CW.
>> Thanks so much!
>> 73,
>> Tom Bewick, k2bew
>>
>> On Sat, Dec 28, 2019, 22:17 Jim Danehy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> The electrical pulses from your ear to your brain travel at extremely fast
>>> speed.
>>>
>>> The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles a second ; about
>>> 670,616,629 mph.
>>>
>>> My point ? At QRQ CW speeds something occurs that you normally do not
>>> encounter at slower speeds.  Look at a dictionary. Many words start with a
>>> common pattern. After 5 or 6 letters there are alternatives. At QRQ speed
>>> Your brain is actually ahead of what your ear is feeding your brain. It is
>>> giving you a choice of words to choose from.
>>>
>>> The task is to choose the correct one. You are aided in that choice by the
>>> context of the message. I don?t know why this occurs. But it does.
>>>
>>> So when you learn to copy Entire words rather than letters ; this is the
>>> phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. It helps but it can also throw you a
>>> curve ball. That is where message context enters the equation.
>>>
>>> When you copy entire words rather than all the letters you have
>>> assistance. Your ability to copy faster speeds will improve with time. I
>>> only mention this as things get better the longer you stay with it.
>>>
>>> It is called getting over the hump. Or through the walk.
>>>
>>> It usually appears more difficult to increase your speed. However things
>>> do occur that help you achieve the ability to copy entire words. Then QRQ
>>> CW becomes conversational.  Kind of like auto fill with computer typing.
>>>
>>> 73
>>> Jim
>>> W9VNE / VA3VNE
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> ______________________________________________________________
>>> Elecraft mailing list
>>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>>
>>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>
>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Sat, 28 Dec 2019 23:02:53 -0800
> From: Jim Brown <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Learning Morse Code
> Message-ID:
> <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> On 12/28/2019 8:45 PM, David Bunte wrote:
>> Just getting on the air and making QSOs has helped my speed more than
>> anything else.
>
> CW contesting is also great for building CW copying skills.
>
> 73, Jim K9YC
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 12:29:28 +0000
> From: David Woolley <[hidden email]>
> To: Kevin McQuiggin <[hidden email]>, Jim Danehy <[hidden email]>
> Cc: Elecraft Mailing List <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> Neve conduction is actually a mixture of chemical and electrical
> mechanisms, in vertebrates.  The signal travels electrically in short
> hops, and is then regenerated by a chemical process.  Invertebrates have
> propagation velocities of more like 1 metre / second.
> <http://www.biologymad.com/NervousSystem/nerveimpulses.htm#impulsespeed>
>
> --
> David Woolley
>
> On 29/12/2019 03:27, Kevin McQuiggin wrote:
>> It does not negate the argument, but nerve impulses are based on chemical reactions in neurons, and only travel at about 120 metres per second.
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 05:55:21 -0700 (MST)
> From: Barry <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> While I agree with the OP about copying conversational QRQ, the
> redundancy/anticipation doesn't hold true when copying callsigns, such as in
> the case of running RUFZ.
>
> I don't know if the number has gone up in the last ~10 years, as that was
> the last time I participated in the IARU HST, but at that time, 2 guys
> (DJ1YFK and YT7AW) broke 200 WPM.  When in my prime, I hit about 120 WPM
> running RUFZ.  200 sounds like a buzz saw to me.  Maybe these guys have
> narrower gaps in their synapses?
>
> Barry W2UP (HST 2011 Bronze medal in RUFZ)
>
>
>
> --
> Sent from: http://elecraft.365791.n2.nabble.com/
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 06:05:58 -0700 (MST)
> From: Barry <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Learning Morse Code
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Jim Brown-10 wrote
>> CW contesting is also great for building CW copying skills.
>>
>> 73, Jim K9YC
>
> Yup.  Like the old joke, "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?"  Practice!
>
> I also suspect age has a lot to do with it.  I was licensed at 12.  Upgraded
> at 13, but couldn't afford a SSB radio for 2-3 years, so did CW only.  Found
> the QRQ guys (in the early 70s) at the low end of 40 CW and programs were
> available, I found I hit a wall at ~100 WPM, despite practice.  Other than
> contesting, I really haven't been active for the last 5-10 years and my
> speed has significantly dropped.
>
> Barry W2UP
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Sent from: http://elecraft.365791.n2.nabble.com/
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 08:48:37 -0500
> From: Don Wilhelm <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] K3 - Power cable voltage drop
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> As Bob has pointed out,  power drop is not the factor in the voltage to
> an Elecraft transceiver.
>
> No matter what the supply voltage may be, the K2/K3/K3S/KX2/KX3 will
> attempt to produce the output power requested by the power knob setting.
>  Those transceivers actually measure the output power rather than the
> drive level as is done by many other transceivers.
>
> The problem is that the transmit IMD increases as the voltage drops, so
> running with a higher voltage results in a cleaner signal on the air.
>
> Of course, if you are an "all knobs right" operator, you may notice a
> bit of a drop in the maximum power available on some bands.  Instead of
> 114 watts, you may get only 95 or 100 watts, but that is extreme.
> I recommend that you do not set the power knob above 100 watts in any
> case.  Use the maximum setting only for testing into a dummy load.
>
> The difference between 114 watts and 100 watts is only 0.57 dB and will
> not be noticed on the far end of the transmission.
>
> 73,
> Don W3FPR
>
> On 12/28/2019 5:32 PM, Bob McGraw K4TAX wrote:
>> It is not quite that simple.?? Power drop is not really a factor.
>>
>> The operating range of the radio, from specifications,? is 11 volts
>> minimum to 15 volts maximum. ? Thus with a 4 volt operating range, a 1
>> volt drop represents a 25% change.? Within this range of 11 to 15 volts
>> the radio will attempt to deliver 100 watts by demanding the required
>> amount of current from the power supply. Thus the three resistances in
>> series example, as I stated earlier, with the middle one {radio} being a
>> variable value.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 12
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 08:09:05 -0600
> From: Richard Thorne <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Elecraft] 50 ohm SMD Dummy Load Kit
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> I picked up a SMD soldering station and would like to give surface mount
> a try.
>
> Any suggestions on a SMD 50 ohm dummy load kit?
>
> Rich - N5ZC
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 13
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 14:25:09 +0000 (UTC)
> From: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Elecraft] My K3/100 has been sold
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> My K3 has been sold. Thank you for your inquiries.?
>
> Paul [hidden email]
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 14
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 09:33:48 -0600
> From: Morgan Bailey <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Elecraft] CW skimmer
> Message-ID:
> <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Is one able to run CW skimmer on a K4. If so what model is best suited for
> this the K4 or K4d? Or should i use an RSP2 with out board computer
> dedicated to doing skimmer with the skimmer software?
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 15
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 11:03:34 -0500
> From: Terry Basom <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Elecraft] kx3 FOR SALE
> Message-ID:
> <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> My KX3 has sold.
> 73's to all
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 16
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 11:18:40 -0500
> From: Don Wilhelm <[hidden email]>
> To: Morgan Bailey <[hidden email]>, [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] CW skimmer
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> Morgan,
>
> The K4 (any version) will not run software apps like Skimmer, you will
> need to run that on your shack computer.
>
> While the K4 does contain a processor and a version of an operating
> system, it is used for dedicated K4 functions.
> I would compare it to my fileserver box which runs on a Linux version.
> I can access it via a browser for setup operations, but I cannot load
> and run any other applications on it, it is dedicated to performing its
> fileserver tasks.
>
> 73,
> Don W3FPR
>
> On 12/29/2019 10:33 AM, Morgan Bailey wrote:
>> Is one able to run CW skimmer on a K4. If so what model is best suited for
>> this the K4 or K4d? Or should i use an RSP2 with out board computer
>> dedicated to doing skimmer with the skimmer software?
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 17
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 10:39:11 -0600 (GMT-06:00)
> From: Mike Morrow <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds (OT to Elecraft)
> Message-ID:
> <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> Discussions of Morse copying skills are nowadays addressed to casual amateur efforts where complete and accurate hard-copy output is seldom required.? Professional Morse skill was measured at the speed that the operator produced complete and accurate hard-copy.? An operator who head copies at 50 wpm but hard copies at 15 wpm was a 15 wpm operator.
>
> In the history of Morse for military and commercial service, the ONLY valuable skill was producing accurate hard-copy of both plain language text and code groups.? The professional licenses for radiotelegraphy were the Third Class, Second Class, and First Class Radiotelegraph certificates.? The Third and Second Class licenses required the following:
>
> PLAIN LANGUAGE (including common punctuation) - 20 wpm - Receive and send 100 consecutive characters (1 minute) without error in a 500 character (5 minute) text.
> CODE GROUPS (5-character groups of letters and numbers) - 16 wpm - Receive and send 80 consecutive characters (1 minute) without error in a 400 character (5 minute) text.
>
> Most candidates found that slow-speed code group receiving test to be the most difficult part.? (It took me three 200-mile trips to the Kansas City FCC office to finally pass.) All those mental skills that allow an operator to decipher entire words in plain language are of no help with code groups...there's no process of "hearing code groups".? There is also no possibility of reviewing copied text and context for needed obvious corrections.? Although it's not required for 16 wpm, operators skilled at high speed code groups develop an automatic "unthinking" response to actuate keys on the mill/keyboard as characters are heard.
>
> The era of the professional commercial Morse operator essentially ended in July 1999 when maritime Morse operation ceased in the US.? In the same era the US military banned use of Morse, even going so far as eliminating it from MARS repeater IDs.
>
> It was a great era with great operators.? A dear friend of mine (Al, W5KGM) was a professional Morse operator for airlines and in WWII Atlantic merchant ship convoys from 1937 to the 1970s.? He could do do everything commercial-quality at 60-wpm or better.? He became a silent key at age 102 last year...there aren't many such "real" Morse professionals left.
>
> It's unfortunate that the ham bands have been since 1999 the only place that Morse radiotelegraphy may be heard for practice.? Before that, the marine Morse bands (especially 400 to 520 kHz) provided far more interesting copy for development of Morse reception skill.? (I usually kept a receiver on 500 kHz/600 meters at night.)? Morse skill was also reinforced (at least for a while) in the Cold War for radiomen in my squadron of ballistic missile submarines on the logical consideration that if world events ever provoked missile launch, it was unlikely that normal sophisticated submarine communications networks would exist afterwards.
>
> But today...Morse is only a hobbyist's or historian's undertaking.? I personally found practice at Morse reception to be far more rewarding outside the ham bands...but that option no longer exists.
>
> Mike / KK5F
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 18
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 17:06:33 +0000 (UTC)
> From: [hidden email]
> To: [hidden email], [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] 50 ohm SMD Dummy Load Kit
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> Hi,I found this site with a kit QRP smd parts. https://kc9on.com/product/smd-dummy-load-bnc/
> 73Jim H k7sss
> In a message dated 12/29/2019 6:11:56 AM Pacific Standard Time, [hidden email] writes:
>
> I picked up a SMD soldering station and would like to give surface mount a try.
> Any suggestions on a SMD 50 ohm dummy load kit?
> Rich - N5ZC______________________________________________________________Elecraft mailing listHome: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraftHelp: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htmPost: mailto:[hidden email]
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.netPlease help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.htmlMessage delivered to [hidden email]
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 19
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 11:24:33 -0700 (MST)
> From: K0RKH <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Elecraft] KPA 1500 and receiver noise
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>              I am looking for possible causes of increased receive noise I
> am experiencing whenever I turn on my KPA 1500 .   I have always had this
> issue but at first disregarded it as maybe common mode noise but have since
> experimented a bit by connecting a dummy load to the receiver and producing
> the same results.
>             The receiver is a K3s model and I have taken several
> opportunities to bond all equipment and tried ferrite #33 beads in several
> places with no change in results.
>             Has anyone else on this site had the same problem.  The noise
> is the greatest on 6 and 10 meters where it would show up as more of a
> problem as well with a +20-db noise on 6 meters and +10-db on 10 meters.
>                     Bob   K0RKH
>
>
>
> --
> Sent from: http://elecraft.365791.n2.nabble.com/
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 20
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 11:46:23 -0700
> From: "M. George" <[hidden email]>
> To: N4ZR <[hidden email]>, N7WY-BobR <[hidden email]>
> Cc: Elecraft List <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] K3 - KEY OUT problem
> Message-ID:
> <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Bob N7WY motivated me to provide a few more details on the KEY OUT
> mosfet/Q3/IRFI630 replacement.  I took the bottom off my K3 to show the
> location of the IRFI630 on the bottom of the PCB.  It was a little more
> tricky than I remembered, so you will need to access the main PCB from the
> top of the K3 by removing the KIO3 board and the IO board that has the IF
> output.  I did the replacement without removing the back panel which would
> have been very painful.  Again, I do remember being able to do this without
> a major disassembly.  I de-soldered from the bottom of the PCB and pulled
> and replaced the IRFI630 from the top.  It was tight, but it sure beat
> sending the K3 back to Elecraft and you can do a clean job if you are
> careful.
>
> Here are some new pictures that I just took
> <http://www.nc7j.com/pa/main.php?cmd=album&var1=NG7M%2FRadios%2FK3%2FSmokedKeyOutIRFI630G%2F>
> and annotated with more details of the location of Q3 along with a snippet
> from the Elecraft Schematic where Q3 is located.  Your mileage may vary
> based on your re-work skills but I wouldn't consider this a difficult
> replacement... medium effort at worst.  When in doubt, send your radio in,
> but it's not rocket science:
>
> Updated Pictures:
> http://www.nc7j.com/pa/main.php?cmd=album&var1=NG7M%2FRadios%2FK3%2FSmokedKeyOutIRFI630G%2F
>
> Good Luck!
>
> Max NG7M
>
> On Sat, Dec 28, 2019 at 10:20 AM M. George <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
>> Pete, just saw your question on the PTT OUT not working for you.  I had an
>> issue with this back in 2016... I can't remember what I did, but it wasn't
>> smart and it was my fault... Anyway, I let the smoke/metal out of the IRFI630G
>> that is used on the PPT out.  It's beefy and can take a lot of abuse, but I
>> still managed to destroy it.  Anyway, it's an easy replacement and saved me
>> from shipping my K3 back to Elecraft.  Total operator error in my
>> situation... maybe attached 12v to the PTT out?  Again, I can't remember.
>>
>> Here is a picture of what my damaged MOSFET looked like at the time... see
>> the crack and leakage ;)
>>
>>
>> http://www.nc7j.com/pa/main.php?cmd=imageview&var1=NG7M%2FRadios%2FK3%2FSmokedKeyOutIRFI630G%2FIRFI630GFried.JPG
>>
>> And here is the Mouser part I ordered to replace it:
>>
>>
>> https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Vishay-Siliconix/IRFI630GPBF?qs=%2Fha2pyFaduhSYcFgYMU8ma88%2Fb96%2Fl4SGKWFSYSWEuEDdoRAAyNpCg==
>>
>> Here is the schematic link:
>> https://ftp.elecraft.com/K3/Manuals%20Downloads/K3_Schematics_Jun_2010.pdf
>>
>> Search for IRFI630 in the PDF, you will find it straight away... and I
>> don't remember it being tough to expose the damaged mosfet and replace
>> it...
>>
>> Max NG7M
>>
>> On Sat, Dec 28, 2019 at 8:57 AM N4ZR <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks to everyone who responded.  I've now written to Elecraft Support,
>>> and anticipate that it will have to go back to the mother ship.
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>> 73, Pete N4ZR
>>> Check out the Reverse Beacon Network
>>> at <http://reversebeacon.net>, now
>>> spotting RTTY activity worldwide.
>>> For spots, please use your favorite
>>> "retail" DX cluster.
>>>
>>> ______________________________________________________________
>>> Elecraft mailing list
>>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>>
>>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>>> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> M. George
>>
>
>
> --
> M. George
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 21
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 11:56:35 -0800
> From: Fred Jensen <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Learning Morse Code
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> I'm fairly certain it's an individual thing. In head copy, it starts to
> sound like reading somewhere around 25 for me.? If I'm making record
> copy on a mill or keyboard at around 25-30, I'm not really aware of
> anything I am copying.? It seems to be a direct connection between ears
> and fingers, and I cannot tell you afterwards what I copied.? In my very
> brief 10 months as the "station kid" at a coastal marine station in the
> mid-50's, the Company tried to enforce an 18-20 WPM speed limit while in
> traffic, they believed that was the sweet spot in terms of overall
> throughput [circuit chatter usually ran faster].
>
> Ted McElroy [SK] held [and may still hold] the record set in the 30's I
> think, at 76 WPM with text taken from a newspaper.? That he set the
> record is certain although some have said he may have had the chance to
> see the paper ahead of time.? He also won typing contests which were
> popular at the time.? What may be apocryphal is a rendition that the
> code began, he poured a cup of coffee and lit a cigarette, finally
> sitting down and starting to copy maybe 5 mins later, and continued
> typing for several minutes after the code stopped.
>
> Code groups are said to be much harder than plain text ... the 2nd
> Telegraph in the 50's was 20 plain text and 16 groups.? For some reason,
> I find groups easier and less work, no idea why.? And, after close to 70
> years with Morse, I agree with Tom ... there are lots of ways to learn
> the code with varying efficiency for different people but they all work.
>
> 73,
> Fred ["Skip"] K6DGW
> Sparks NV DM09dn
> Washoe County
> K2 #4398
> K3 #642
> ex KX1 #697
>
> On 12/28/2019 8:25 PM, Tom McCulloch wrote:
>> I agree, we all learn by the method our Elmer taught us.? Mine was the
>> A,W,J method at 5 WPM.
>>
>> I've been a CW guys almost exclusively and found 15 wpm to be my
>> personal comfort zone...However I have a question for those higher
>> speed guys out there.? At what speed would you say you start hearing
>> complete words rather than the individual letters and as a result you
>> could pretty much copy in your head (Jim said he doesn't write
>> anything over 20 WPM).? To me that's aweome (also unachievable..hi)
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Tom WB2QDG
>>
>> K2 # 1103 (I think)
>>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 22
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 14:05:32 -0800
> From: Phil Kane <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds (OT to Elecraft)
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> On 12/29/2019 8:39 AM, Mike Morrow wrote:
>
>> But today...Morse is only a hobbyist's or historian's undertaking.  I
>> personally found practice at Morse reception to be far more rewarding
>> outside the ham bands...but that option no longer exists.
>
> Check out <www.radiomarine.org> for the schedule of operations of KPH /
> KFS / KSM  Morse press and traffic transmissions every Saturday.
>
> 73 de K2ASP - Phil Kane
> Elecraft K2/100   s/n 5402
>
>> From a Clearing in the Silicon Forest
> Beaverton (Washington County) Oregon
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 23
> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2019 15:17:41 -0700
> From: Jim White NC0JW <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Elecraft] Elecraft SSB net for Sunday December29, 2019
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Our normal net control Eric WB9JNZ is on a two week holiday vacation and is scheduled to resume net control duties next week.  14 checks ins today with Brian's (K1NW) help as a relay station.  Thanks for the help Brian!  We were even able to dig Peter ZL1PWD out of the noise and get him checked in.  Thanks for your patience Peter.
>
> Sunday December 29, 2019:
>
> K1NW Brian RI K3 4974 Relay station
> KS6F Guy CA K3S 10650
> K7BRR Bill AZ K3S 10939
> K8NU Carl OH K3S 10996
> N7BDL Terry AZ K3S 10373
> W4DML Doug TN K3 6433
> KD8CIV John MI KX3 4654
> W9LSE Bob WI K3 945
> W2RWA Dick NY K3 2603
> N6PGQ Bob CA K3 5891
> W6US Jim NV K3S 11215
> K4KSW Jack FL K3S 10179
> ZL1PWD Peter NZ K3 139
> NC0JW Jim CO KX3 1356 Net control
>
> The Elecraft SSB Net meets on Sunday at 1800 UTC on or about 14.3035 MHz.   With propagation at a low point we employ several relay stations located around the continental USA to assist with check ins.  As conditions permit we take questions and comments after check ins.
>
> Make it a point to join us next week for the first net of the new year and the new decade.
>
> Jim White - NC0JW
> [hidden email]
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Post to: [hidden email]
> http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> You must be a subscriber to post.
> Elecraft web page: http://www.elecraft.com
>
> End of Elecraft Digest, Vol 188, Issue 34
> *****************************************

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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Edward R Cole
In reply to this post by Jim Danehy
I'm not a high speed CW operator.  Most of my operation was on 40m in
my Novice year and a little on CW eme.

I found my self hearing complete words or character groups at about
10wpm.  Examples: CQ, QRZ, SK, Name, RST, 73, QTH, and certain well
known callsigns.  Others that I can't recall at the moment.  I
usually operated eme at 15 wpm.  Back in my early years I could send
20 wpm with a straight key.  Never mastered a paddle.

When I get back on eme I probably will send with a keyboard since my
hand dexterity has fallen off since loosing a finger on my right
hand.  Typing is also a challenge since missing a finger requires the
backup finger to handle twice as many keys.  On eme I have several
common scrips saved to send at a press of a key.  But receiving is
still done by ear/mind.

73, Ed - KL7UW
   http://www.kl7uw.com
Dubus-NA Business mail:
   [hidden email]

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Copying CW at high speeds

Rose
In reply to this post by K8TE
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Rose <[hidden email]>
Date: Sun, Dec 29, 2019, 17:42
Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Copying CW at high speeds
To: K8TE <[hidden email]>, Rose <[hidden email]>


Your post reminded me of the day in October, 1951 when the FCC Engineer
from Denver named Neeb had me send for him and he said; "Son, that's mighty
fine CW".

I had been driven to OKC by my "Elmer"
Reedy Booker, W5ADC (now a SK).  I had been studying for the then once a
year visit to OKC by the FCC.  Was so happy to pass, and out of that was
issued one of the first Novice Class calls (WN5TKI). See my QRZ page.

Years later went back "home" to visit Reedy.  Found him in a nursing home,
tied in a wheelchair.  He didn't know me or even that I was there.  His
hands were cold as I held them.  GAWD how I cried then and again as I write
this email.  Such a blunder I'd made!

Don't make the same mistake.  Take time to thank your "Elmer".

73

Ken Kopp - K0PP


On Sun, Dec 29, 2019, 16:54 K8TE <[hidden email]> wrote:

> CW scared me to death after my traumatic experience with the FCC in
> Syracuse
> NY in 1960.  I had only several weeks to practice since I had been in HK4
> as
> an exchange student for a long Summer where I operated SSB on a friend's
> DX-100 and HQ-170.  I passed the General, but probably with one or no
> characters to spare.  At 14 years old, that made a lasting impression!
>
> With the advent of vanity calls, I chose to dump WA8WWM for K8TE in the
> mid-1970s.  I also passed  the 1st Class Radiotelephone in Detroit and the
> 2nd Class Radiotelegraph exam in Lubbock a couple years later.  I though
> the
> plain text for the latter was 22 wpm and cypher groups at 18.  It was a
> long
> time ago.
>
> CW for me went by the wayside until FD 2012 when I had to fill-in an empty
> two-hour CW slot, I the SSB Team captain.  With trepidation, I started
> running.  With about 150 calls in the log, I decided it was possible to
> operate CW and not achieve a higher heart beat than QSO rate.
>
> Since then, I have used LCWO.net for callsign practice.  I can copy at 75%
> accuracy above 40 wpm now.  I have a friend who listens to CW at the gym or
> on the road and has improved his speed significantly.  I have yet to feel a
> desire to rag chew.  But I can easily copy my callsign in DX pileups well
> above the infrequent 35 wpm speed.  I am proof that practice matters a lot!
>
> My purpose is to encourage the synapses to transfer callsigns and exchanges
> from sound to the keyboard.  I don't have time to rag chew in CW and rarely
> find time for extended SSB QSO's.  Still, I really enjoy chasing DX, POTA,
> SOTA, Counties, contesting, etc., especially on CW where contacts (usually)
> are brief and to the point, to say nothing of the difference in FD (no
> "Please Copy", Bill, AE6JV).
>
> Happy New Year and 73, Bill, K8TE
>
>
>
> --
> Sent from: http://elecraft.365791.n2.nabble.com/
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
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> Message delivered to [hidden email]
>
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Jim Brown-10
In reply to this post by K8TE
On 12/29/2019 3:53 PM, K8TE wrote:
> where I operated SSB on a friend's
> DX-100 and HQ-170.

Bill,

I remember the DX100 as an AM/CW rig. As a teenager, I was loaned one
(and an SX-101) by a local ham who couldn't pass his 13 wpm code speed test.

73, Jim K9YC
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Wes Stewart-2
You remember correctly.  I owned one. I also used the modulated HV to run an
829B on two-meter AM.

Wes  N7WS

On 12/30/2019 10:55 AM, Jim Brown wrote:

> On 12/29/2019 3:53 PM, K8TE wrote:
>> where I operated SSB on a friend's
>> DX-100 and HQ-170.
>
> Bill,
>
> I remember the DX100 as an AM/CW rig. As a teenager, I was loaned one (and an
> SX-101) by a local ham who couldn't pass his 13 wpm code speed test.
>
> 73, Jim K9YC

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KX3 Utility Terminal window for CW

David Haines
In reply to this post by Jim Brown-10
I'm enjoying and getting a lot out of our CW discussion.  I've tried to
use the KX3 uUtility for practice sending CW.

p. 60 of Fred Cady's big, excellent Elecraft KX-Line book says I should
be able to use the Terminal window of the Utility to display the text of
the CW I'm sending, but I've never been able to get it to work.

Any ideas?

david

KC!DNY


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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

Gary Smith-2
In reply to this post by Wes Stewart-2
This over 100 WPM is better than I have
ever been able to do. To that end, I have
a cert for 45 WPM from some time back and
though I don't own that speed today, I can
copy at that speed, it's just my brain
lags and it didn't use to.

The last Stew Perry contest, I realized my
bottleneck was typing in the grid square,
I'd have to memorize each report and then
hen-peck the data into the keyboard which
I have to use 4 fingers to do (long
story).

I came to understand what I needed to do
was not remember the call and type before
replying, I need to listen to the call,
it's 100% in my head then, but then hit
the N1MM reply for report, and while it's
sending the data, then input the data in
my head into N1MM.

I cannot hear and type at the same time,
but I can copy most everything sent in
clean CW, regardless of reasonable speed.
I admire those that can sight read music
at tempo, it's the same as hearing CW and
transcribing it at the same time.

Mandatory Elecraft content, I have paid
for a K4D and will be happy when I get it,
time waiting till then is irrelevant.

Happy New Year to all!

73,

Gary
KA1J
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Re: Copying CW at high speeds

k6dgw
But I doubt the K4D will have much effect on your code speed. [:=)

73,
Fred ["Skip"] K6DGW
Sparks NV DM09dn
Washoe County

On 12/31/2019 3:21 PM, Gary Smith wrote:

> Mandatory Elecraft content, I have paid
> for a K4D and will be happy when I get it,
> time waiting till then is irrelevant.
>
> Happy New Year to all!
>
> 73,
>
> Gary
> KA1J
> ______________________________________________________________
>

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Re: KX3 Utility Terminal window for CW

Ingo Meyer, DK3RED-2
In reply to this post by David Haines
Hello David,

> I'm enjoying and getting a lot out of our CW discussion.  I've tried to use the KX3
> uUtility for practice sending CW.
>
> p. 60 of Fred Cady's big, excellent Elecraft KX-Line book says I shouldbe able to use the
> Terminal window of the Utility to display the text of the CW I'm sending, but I've never
> been able to get it to work.
>
> Any ideas?

I use the "Terminal Window" of "Elecraft KX3 Utility" for typing CW via keyboard.And the
characters sent are displayed.

But I can't decode characters given with the key. Only via keyboard - butthat was not your
intention. Did Fred Cady write if they were the characters entered with a key or with a
keyboard?

73/72 de Ingo, DK3RED - Don't forget: the fun is the power!
www.qrp4fun.de - [hidden email]


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Re: KX3 Utility Terminal window for CW

Don Wilhelm
Ingo and all,

The characters entered with the keyboard will be perfectly formed,
If entered via paddles, bug ot hand key, they may not be perfectly
formed and may not be decoded properly.
This is a tool that can be used to practice your sending.

73 and HNY,
Don W3FPR

On 12/31/2019 7:48 PM, Ingo Meyer, DK3RED wrote:
> Hello David,
>
>> I'm enjoying and getting a lot out of our CW discussion.  I've tried
>> to use the KX3 uUtility for practice sending CW.
>>
>> p. 60 of Fred Cady's big, excellent Elecraft KX-Line book says I
>> shouldbe able to use the Terminal window of the Utility to display the
>> text of the CW I'm sending, but I've never been able to get it to work.
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Re: KX3 Utility Terminal window for CW

David Haines
In reply to this post by Ingo Meyer, DK3RED-2
Fred says "Optionally, you can use the KX3 Utility to monitor an
extended display of characters sent from the KX3's keyer."  I assume
"keyer" could refer to the paddle connected to the KX3.

I can type characters into the Utility Terminal lower window and
Transmit the CW.  The characters sent are displayed in the top window.

david

KC1DNY

On 12/31/2019 7:48 PM, Ingo Meyer, DK3RED wrote:

> Hello David,
>
>> I'm enjoying and getting a lot out of our CW discussion.  I've tried
>> to use the KX3 uUtility for practice sending CW.
>>
>> p. 60 of Fred Cady's big, excellent Elecraft KX-Line book says I
>> shouldbe able to use the Terminal window of the Utility to display
>> the text of the CW I'm sending, but I've never been able to get it to
>> work.
>>
>> Any ideas?
>
> I use the "Terminal Window" of "Elecraft KX3 Utility" for typing CW
> via keyboard.And the characters sent are displayed.
>
> But I can't decode characters given with the key. Only via keyboard -
> butthat was not your intention. Did Fred Cady write if they were the
> characters entered with a key or with a keyboard?
>
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