K2

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K2

Elecraft mailing list
A K2 kit is on it's way.  Although I do have some experience  soldering, it
has been 30+ years and I am open to any suggestions as to  equipment
needed.  I have a Hakko FS-951 soldering station. I have seen  various mechanisms
for holding the circuit boards while working on them.   Any other tips
and/or caveats are more than welcome.  A retirement project,  hopefully to be
completed by the time the sun comes back in a few  years. :)
 
73
Mike KD8RQE
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Re: K2

vk2rq
Get a good set of wire cutters. It’s also handy to have some sort of magnification/lighting — a desk lamp with a magnifying glass built in, or a jeweller’s magnifying this on your head. A good solder sucker just in case. Just take your time, do a full inventory at the start (can be quite helpful in identifying parts through a process of elimination where the markings may be ambiguous/unclear), double-check everything as you go, and enjoy the process.

-- 
73 de Matt VK2RQ

On 2 June 2016 at 8:52:08 PM, Mike via Elecraft ([hidden email]) wrote:

A K2 kit is on it's way. Although I do have some experience soldering, it  
has been 30+ years and I am open to any suggestions as to equipment  
needed. I have a Hakko FS-951 soldering station. I have seen various mechanisms  
for holding the circuit boards while working on them. Any other tips  
and/or caveats are more than welcome. A retirement project, hopefully to be  
completed by the time the sun comes back in a few years. :)  

73  
Mike KD8RQE  
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Re: K2

daleputnam
Hi Mike,
  A good soldering iron, check
A good set of hand tools, - screwdriver, flushcut wirecutters, set of small nutdrivers
A pair of good eyes.. aids are perfectly acceptable.. what ever it takes to SEE lights, magnifiers, etc.
Lots of time.. forget the "gotta get it done by..."
ASK QUESTIONS if needed to this reflector, just like you did.. it is a wealth of info.

take your time, inventory first, and have fun with it.. it is a learning experience, and FUN.. too.

Good Luck, and Congratulations for choosing Elecraft.. the best in the world!!


Have a great day,
--... ...-- Dale - WC7S in Wy

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Re: K2

Don Wilhelm
In reply to this post by Elecraft mailing list
Mike,

If you have only limited experience soldering, check out the Soldering
Tutorial on the Elecraft website.  Most problems are caused by poor
soldering, followed by poorly stripped and tinned toroid leads, and that
followed by misplaced components.

A quick insight on soldering - the old thinking of using a minimum
soldering time to avoid damage should be discarded with modern
temperature controlled soldering stations - that was for the old days of
non-controlled irons that got very hot.
We now have boards with thru-plated holes and components that will
withstand soldering temperatures for at least 5 seconds.  I normally use
a temperature of 750 degF.

Watch for the solder to flow as you solder.  It should wick out
completely onto the solder pad and the component lead in 2 to 3
seconds.  If it takes longer than that the iron is too cold, if shorter,
the iron is too hot.  Larger leads and solder pads connected to the
ground plane are exceptions and are expected to take longer.

While a highly reactive solder flux (like Kester 44) is OK, IMHO it
leaves a flux mess.
I use solder with a mildly reactive flux (Kester 385) and there is very
little solder residue.

Do *not* clean the flux except in areas that have been reworked several
times, and then clean up with alcohol on a swab.  Do *not* flood the
board and get residue under components where it cannot be removed except
by de-soldering the components.
If you do attempt to remove the flux, make sure *all* of it is gone.  
Flux is not conductive, but when combined with flux removers, any
residue left may develop conductive paths when exposed to normal
moisture in the air.  If you see 'whitish' rings around component leads,
the flux and remover residue is still present and can cause problems later.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 6/2/2016 6:51 AM, Mike via Elecraft wrote:
> A K2 kit is on it's way.  Although I do have some experience  soldering, it
> has been 30+ years and I am open to any suggestions as to  equipment
> needed.  I have a Hakko FS-951 soldering station. I have seen  various mechanisms
> for holding the circuit boards while working on them.   Any other tips
> and/or caveats are more than welcome.  A retirement project,  hopefully to be
> completed by the time the sun comes back in a few  years. :)
>

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Re: K2

Josh Fiden
I would respectfully disagree with this advice. It is dependent on the
type of iron you're using. The Hakko FX-951 behaves quite different from
the traditional temperature controlled stations. It has very fast
thermal recovery, so typical through hole pads will flow in much less
than 3 seconds, but not because the iron is too hot.

73,
Josh W6XU

On 6/2/2016 8:52 AM, Don Wilhelm wrote:
> It should wick out completely onto the solder pad and the component
> lead in 2 to 3 seconds.  If it takes longer than that the iron is too
> cold, if shorter, the iron is too hot.

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Re: K2

Eric J
In reply to this post by Don Wilhelm
I have two K2's. I didn't build either of them. One I bought off ebay 10
years ago (SN 567). The other I bought two years ago off this list
(SN6911). Since I wanted something I didn't have to build, I could have
bought ANY of the major brands. The K2 was a clear choice for me. Both
perform exactly the same (SN 567 has all the latest mods) and both are
as reliable as bricks.

So, obviously, enjoy the building experience, but know at the end,
you've chosen one of the best rigs in its class which will give you
years of reliable service. And if it doesn't, you can fix it! I gave
away a 10 year old TS-430S because I could no longer find parts.

Eric KE6US

On 6/2/2016 6:51 AM, Mike via Elecraft wrote:
>> A K2 kit is on it's way.  Although I do have some experience  
>> soldering, it
>> has been 30+ years and I am open to any suggestions as to equipment
>> needed.  I have a Hakko FS-951 soldering station. I have seen various
>> mechanisms
>> for holding the circuit boards while working on them.   Any other tips
>> and/or caveats are more than welcome.  A retirement project,
>> hopefully to be
>> completed by the time the sun comes back in a few  years. :)

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For Sale- K3/0 remote & K3 options & accessories

bhemmis

Having sold my K3 s/n 6625 posted here earlier this week, I have some options & accessories for sale.

K3/0 remote s/n 0169 w/ cables for Remote Rig & manual. (Note this is the original full size K3 remote-not the mini.)   $ 450
13 kHz AM, FM. ESSB filter   $ 115
MH2 hand mic   $ 45
W2 wattmeter with 1.8-54 MHz, 2 KW module   $ 225
SignaLink USB digi interface w/ K3 cables $ 80
LP Pan 2 Panadapter (for K3) w/ cables   $ 200

All gear in AS-New condition, working 100%  and from a non-smoker home.

All prices include USPS shipping CONUS and PayPal fees. Gear can also be picked up at my suburban Cleveland, OH QTH

Brian K3USC (since 1962)

[hidden email]

home phone 216-848-0211
mobile phone 814-866-2585
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Re: K2

Don Wilhelm
In reply to this post by Josh Fiden
That "rule" still applies - if less than 2 seconds, reduce the iron
temperature, if longer than 3 seconds, increase it.
A lot will depend on the size and heat mass of the soldering tip more so
than the recovery time of the iron.  A quick recovery is fine, but is
not the whole story.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 6/2/2016 12:43 PM, Josh Fiden wrote:

> I would respectfully disagree with this advice. It is dependent on the
> type of iron you're using. The Hakko FX-951 behaves quite different
> from the traditional temperature controlled stations. It has very fast
> thermal recovery, so typical through hole pads will flow in much less
> than 3 seconds, but not because the iron is too hot.
>
> 73,
> Josh W6XU
>
> On 6/2/2016 8:52 AM, Don Wilhelm wrote:
>> It should wick out completely onto the solder pad and the component
>> lead in 2 to 3 seconds.  If it takes longer than that the iron is too
>> cold, if shorter, the iron is too hot.
>

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Re: K2

lstavenhagen
In reply to this post by Elecraft mailing list
I've built 2 K2's; it's not too hard to build but there are difficult spots:

- grounding the crystal cans (save the anti-static pads that the IC's ship on!).
- installing/soldering the LCD to the front panel board (issue with spacers)
- installing/soldering L33
- clearance issue between L33 and bottom cover
- winding transformers in the BFO and final amplifier circuit.
- desoldering tools.

So instead of listing my experience on these items again, I'll just list them and say do a search on each of these in the archives before you start the build. That way, you'll be more or less acquainted with the 'gotchas' when you get to them.

These are nothing that will stop you, just items that require some care and may be a little confusing.

Enjoy!
73,
LS
W5QD
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Re: For Sale- K3 options & accessories- remaining items list

bhemmis
In reply to this post by bhemmis
Updated listing of remaining items...

>
> Having sold my K3 s/n 6625 posted here earlier this week, I have some options & accessories for sale.
>
> KFLA3A 2.7k 5 pole standard K3 SSB filter   $ 40
> W2 wattmeter with 1.8-54 MHz, 2 KW module   $ 225
> SignaLink USB digi interface w/ K3 cables $ 80
> LP Pan 2 Panadapter (for K3) w/ cables   $ 200
>
> All gear in AS-New condition, working 100%  and from a non-smoker home.
>
> All prices include USPS shipping CONUS and PayPal fees. Gear can also be picked up at my suburban Cleveland, OH QTH
>
> Brian K3USC (since 1962)
>
> [hidden email]
>
> home phone 216-848-0211
> mobile phone 814-866-2585
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
> Message delivered to [hidden email]

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Re: K2

Josh Fiden
In reply to this post by Don Wilhelm
Sorry, that simply is not true. You don't understand how these Metcal,
newer Hakko (and other) irons work. Our production facility produces
thousands of through-hole boards per month. After testing the newer
soldering stations we immediately started replacing conventional Weller
WTCPT and Hakko 936 irons because both time per joint is faster and
temperature is more consistent as you move to the next joint.

These newer designs intentionally use tips with low thermal mass, have a
fast control loop (rather than slow on/off cycling), and sense
temperature at the tip. Adjusting the iron temperature is normally not
required because the iron instantaneously provides more heat to maintain
the set temperature. If the rate is too slow, you would first look at
tip geometry to more efficiently transfer heat.

This document describes the functional difference between conventional
vs new irons.
http://www.eis-inc.com/Files/pdf/supplier_showcase_page_downloads/oki/Tech_Note_High_Throughput_With_SmarHeat.pdf

73,
Josh W6XU

On 6/2/2016 10:25 AM, Don Wilhelm wrote:

> That "rule" still applies - if less than 2 seconds, reduce the iron
> temperature, if longer than 3 seconds, increase it.
> A lot will depend on the size and heat mass of the soldering tip more
> so than the recovery time of the iron.  A quick recovery is fine, but
> is not the whole story.
>
> 73,
> Don W3FPR
>
> On 6/2/2016 12:43 PM, Josh Fiden wrote:
>> I would respectfully disagree with this advice. It is dependent on
>> the type of iron you're using. The Hakko FX-951 behaves quite
>> different from the traditional temperature controlled stations. It
>> has very fast thermal recovery, so typical through hole pads will
>> flow in much less than 3 seconds, but not because the iron is too hot.

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Re: K2

Don Wilhelm
I have not used one of those irons yet, so I can't comment on those
statements.
What I can say for certainty is that the component lead and solder pad
must be heated sufficiently to allow the solder to flow onto both and
out to a very thin (almost invisible) edge.

There is more to soldering than just melting the solder - it has to flow
out onto both surfaces and adhere to both of them.  If the flow does not
happen, you are just "pasting solder".  I am certain that can happen
with any type of soldering iron.

The document that Josh referenced indicates that soldering may be done
at a lower temperature with these irons, and that is OK - know your
soldering tool and watch the solder flow as you work.

73,
Don W3FPR

On 6/2/2016 11:36 PM, Josh Fiden wrote:

> Sorry, that simply is not true. You don't understand how these Metcal,
> newer Hakko (and other) irons work. Our production facility produces
> thousands of through-hole boards per month. After testing the newer
> soldering stations we immediately started replacing conventional
> Weller WTCPT and Hakko 936 irons because both time per joint is faster
> and temperature is more consistent as you move to the next joint.
>
> These newer designs intentionally use tips with low thermal mass, have
> a fast control loop (rather than slow on/off cycling), and sense
> temperature at the tip. Adjusting the iron temperature is normally not
> required because the iron instantaneously provides more heat to
> maintain the set temperature. If the rate is too slow, you would first
> look at tip geometry to more efficiently transfer heat.
>
> This document describes the functional difference between conventional
> vs new irons.
> http://www.eis-inc.com/Files/pdf/supplier_showcase_page_downloads/oki/Tech_Note_High_Throughput_With_SmarHeat.pdf 
>
>

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Re: K2

Edward R Cole
In reply to this post by Elecraft mailing list
I upgraded to the Hakko FX-951 a couple years ago because I needed a
more reliable solder iron for the sm production I was
doing.  Probably 60-70% of my work was doing sm vs thru-hole
soldering.  I bought several different sized tips for handling
different work.  I've found 670F degrees works well and I use the
"sleep" feature of the Hakko which automatically lowers temp to 400F
after a short period of no use which extends life of the tips.  The
iron warms back to 670F in about 3-4 seconds which is announced by an
audible beep so you do not need to look away from your work.

In 2015 I built eleven transverters, five mmic preamps, and seven 2m
amplifiers; another five amplifiers in 2016.  All this was for
customers so does not reflect working on my personal "stuff".

Tips:
T15-D08 is what I use most of the time as its 0.8 mm small chisel tip
works well with sm down to 0402
T15-D12 was my original choice 1.2 mm chisel but found it too large
for smaller sm (OK above 0805); I also use this for thru-hole or
where the thermal mass is a bit more.
T15-DL52 is a big tip (about 1/4-inch chisel) for soldering PL-259's
and sheet metal shields, large leads on power transistors, etc. that
require a lot of heat transfer that you want done quickly to avoid
overheating component.
T15-ILS conical tip has not gotten much use but handy for desoldering
pcb holes with use of solder sucker on back side of the board.

I just installed a 44-pin header and socket on a pcb (thru hole) and
each lead took about 1-2 seconds (leads .025 inch square so little
mass).  Took me less than 10-min. to install the header and sockets
in their respective pcb.

I particularly like the wire tip cleaner vs wet sponge method of old
Weller irons as it does not cool the tip.  Also very handy to clean
the tip before making every contact.

I have replaced the T15-D08 tip once since buying the iron (shows how
much work I am doing).  Tip actually failed.

I still have a 20-year old Weller that I keep in the garage for
convenience soldering, and I use it for desoldering sm chips where
use of two irons works better at preserving the component.  At 700F
it runs too hot for sm and too cold for big work.  OK for occasional
wire connection but mostly gathers dust.

Ditto on having a good set of hand tools and illuminated optical
enlarger.  High light level required to do good work.

73, Ed - KL7UW
http://www.kl7uw.com
     "Kits made by KL7UW"
Dubus Mag business:
     [hidden email]

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