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K3 CW text decoder

Guy, K2AV
In the later years, since the no-code decision in USA licensing
particularly, I have noted an increase of contest QSO's where the other end
obviously copies 25 WPM somehow and only sends 8-10 wpm, and that clearly
on a hand key.

The flurry of complaints, when 4.51 partially unglued the CW text decode on
the K3, further confirms it.

As someone who could copy 20 WPM at age 14, and can still copy 50-60 wpm in
my head, it is hard to imagine listening to code and not simply
understanding it, like someone talking to me.  I've asked some folks why
the difficulty learning code, and they relate something that usually sounds
like the "13 WPM barrier" tale.

As it turns out, the old way to learn code is all wrong as a universal
method.  Code needs to be learned like a language, and at 20 wpm to start
with.   But that's not how it's done the old way.   The old way has been
around since WWII and the Army Signal Corps. Memorize the alphabet with
visual dots and dashes beside it.  Then just keep at it until you don't
need the card any more.  Do it with a typewriter from the get go.
 Eventually a sound in the ear is directly linked to a typewriter key,
copied autonomically, and you can carry on an unrelated conversation at the
same time.  Buggers don't know what they've copied until they read it on
the page.  Really.

OF COURSE that worked, FOR THEIR PURPOSES.  People CAN learn code that way.
 But quite MORE CANNOT.  What did army do?  They sent 100 draftees into a
class and then kept the 30 best in the signal corp and sent the other 70
back to the infantry.  That WOULD work for an army.  But it clearly is not
a universal method, and using dash dot cards prevalently in hamdom all
these years produces a 70% who gave up on code, and now use CW decoders in
CW contests because CW contests are FUN!!! and CW covers distance way
better than SSB.

So what's this cr*p about learning code at 20 WPM?  NOBODY can translate 20
wpm sound to dididahdahdidit and then to question mark by looking at the
card, at 20 WPM.

Well, you're exactly right, of course they can't, and that's the point.
 THAT METHOD is doomed to failure for 70% of those who try it.

CW needs to be learned from 20 wpm code SOUNDS.   The *WORD* "and" at 40
wpm has a distinctive sound that has nothing to do with letters.  The WORD
"and" has the same exact sound at 20, 35, 50 and 75 wpm, if the sending and
receiving hasn't mushed the sound and made it indistinct at  higher speeds.
 Not hearing it at 75 is a matter of INDISTINCTNESS or not concentrating,
it's not copy speed.  If it's distinct the word "and"  sounds the same at
any speed.

One will not be able to copy German at 50 wpm, if you don't know the SOUND
of German words in CW.

It's like listening to an auctioneer talking really fast.  The issue is
making your mind stay up with him and how clearly he ennunciates his fast
words.

New way.  Code learners hear the sounds of most common letters at 20 wpm
right off the bat.  E  T  A N.  You memorize the SOUND,  no visual dots and
dashes, no repeating dits and dahs to oneself.  You learn the SOUND of the
letter, first off.  Then learn words:   eat   tea   net  at  an  ten
Speed is never an issue.  Ever.  Almost nobody fails in this method.

You don't need to text decode that code.  You just listen to it, just like
listening to SSB.  Except CW has that 10 dB advantage and you get a lot
more signals in the same space.

Contact W0UCE.   See w0uce.net   Life can be good.  Listen to a CW QSO as
you walk around the room doing something else.  Keep firmware 4.51.

73, Guy.
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Re: K3 CW text decoder

N5GE-2
Very well said Guy!

When I took my training for MOS 051.1 (High speed CW operator), they didn't tell
us we would go back to the infantry.  They told us we would go to cook school!

The only time I ever use SSB these days is on my NAVY/MARINE CORPS MARS nets.
NAVMARCORMARS still allows CW on their nets and those of us who can, use it when
conditions are poor if we know the NCS is a CW user.

Amateur Radio Operator N5GE
ARRL Lifetime Member
QCWA Lifetime Member

On Mon, 23 Jul 2012 09:43:38 -0400, Guy Olinger K2AV <[hidden email]>
wrote:

>In the later years, since the no-code decision in USA licensing
>particularly, I have noted an increase of contest QSO's where the other end
>obviously copies 25 WPM somehow and only sends 8-10 wpm, and that clearly
>on a hand key.
>
>The flurry of complaints, when 4.51 partially unglued the CW text decode on
>the K3, further confirms it.
>
>As someone who could copy 20 WPM at age 14, and can still copy 50-60 wpm in
>my head, it is hard to imagine listening to code and not simply
>understanding it, like someone talking to me.  I've asked some folks why
>the difficulty learning code, and they relate something that usually sounds
>like the "13 WPM barrier" tale.
>
>As it turns out, the old way to learn code is all wrong as a universal
>method.  Code needs to be learned like a language, and at 20 wpm to start
>with.   But that's not how it's done the old way.   The old way has been
>around since WWII and the Army Signal Corps. Memorize the alphabet with
>visual dots and dashes beside it.  Then just keep at it until you don't
>need the card any more.  Do it with a typewriter from the get go.
> Eventually a sound in the ear is directly linked to a typewriter key,
>copied autonomically, and you can carry on an unrelated conversation at the
>same time.  Buggers don't know what they've copied until they read it on
>the page.  Really.
>
>OF COURSE that worked, FOR THEIR PURPOSES.  People CAN learn code that way.
> But quite MORE CANNOT.  What did army do?  They sent 100 draftees into a
>class and then kept the 30 best in the signal corp and sent the other 70
>back to the infantry.  That WOULD work for an army.  But it clearly is not
>a universal method, and using dash dot cards prevalently in hamdom all
>these years produces a 70% who gave up on code, and now use CW decoders in
>CW contests because CW contests are FUN!!! and CW covers distance way
>better than SSB.
>
>So what's this cr*p about learning code at 20 WPM?  NOBODY can translate 20
>wpm sound to dididahdahdidit and then to question mark by looking at the
>card, at 20 WPM.
>
>Well, you're exactly right, of course they can't, and that's the point.
> THAT METHOD is doomed to failure for 70% of those who try it.
>
>CW needs to be learned from 20 wpm code SOUNDS.   The *WORD* "and" at 40
>wpm has a distinctive sound that has nothing to do with letters.  The WORD
>"and" has the same exact sound at 20, 35, 50 and 75 wpm, if the sending and
>receiving hasn't mushed the sound and made it indistinct at  higher speeds.
> Not hearing it at 75 is a matter of INDISTINCTNESS or not concentrating,
>it's not copy speed.  If it's distinct the word "and"  sounds the same at
>any speed.
>
>One will not be able to copy German at 50 wpm, if you don't know the SOUND
>of German words in CW.
>
>It's like listening to an auctioneer talking really fast.  The issue is
>making your mind stay up with him and how clearly he ennunciates his fast
>words.
>
>New way.  Code learners hear the sounds of most common letters at 20 wpm
>right off the bat.  E  T  A N.  You memorize the SOUND,  no visual dots and
>dashes, no repeating dits and dahs to oneself.  You learn the SOUND of the
>letter, first off.  Then learn words:   eat   tea   net  at  an  ten
>Speed is never an issue.  Ever.  Almost nobody fails in this method.
>
>You don't need to text decode that code.  You just listen to it, just like
>listening to SSB.  Except CW has that 10 dB advantage and you get a lot
>more signals in the same space.
>
>Contact W0UCE.   See w0uce.net   Life can be good.  Listen to a CW QSO as
>you walk around the room doing something else.  Keep firmware 4.51.
>
>73, Guy.
>______________________________________________________________
>Elecraft mailing list
>Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
>This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html

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Re: K3 CW text decoder

Millerhill
Hey...I resemble that remark!

Ok...well I'm one of those poor recruits that happened to score well in the cw aptitude test although I had absolutely no prior knowledge of the code. After 6 months at CT school in Pensecola, I was merrily copying away with...yes...wait for it...a typewriter. NO way I could even come close to copying in my head. As Guy said, copying 5 letter code groups was the primary gig and it was all just a mechanical reaction to a letter sound. After leaving the Navy, I never pursued cw or becoming a ham. It was not until recently (about 5 months ago) that I got my ticket and plunged back into re-learning CW and although I remembered most of the letters, it was not as easy as I imagined it would be, especially since I had no experience sending and had no idea what a QSO sounded like . Well, I'm up to about 25 WPM at this point and very gradually getting to recognize words. I think I'm still a long way from copying in my head 100%, but I'm hoping that after about a year, I should be in g
 ood shape. I've been averaging about 4 QSO's a day (I haven't tried the mike on my K2 yet) and wish I could do more, but I ain't retired YET and still have to chase the almighty dollar around.

So all of you "I can copy in my head at 60 WPM"...how long did it take you to learn how to do that?

73
Steve



On Jul 23, 2012, at 1:19 PM, N5GE wrote:

> Very well said Guy!
>
> When I took my training for MOS 051.1 (High speed CW operator), they didn't tell
> us we would go back to the infantry.  They told us we would go to cook school!
>
> The only time I ever use SSB these days is on my NAVY/MARINE CORPS MARS nets.
> NAVMARCORMARS still allows CW on their nets and those of us who can, use it when
> conditions are poor if we know the NCS is a CW user.
>
> Amateur Radio Operator N5GE
> ARRL Lifetime Member
> QCWA Lifetime Member
>
> On Mon, 23 Jul 2012 09:43:38 -0400, Guy Olinger K2AV <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
>> In the later years, since the no-code decision in USA licensing
>> particularly, I have noted an increase of contest QSO's where the other end
>> obviously copies 25 WPM somehow and only sends 8-10 wpm, and that clearly
>> on a hand key.
>>
>> The flurry of complaints, when 4.51 partially unglued the CW text decode on
>> the K3, further confirms it.
>>
>> As someone who could copy 20 WPM at age 14, and can still copy 50-60 wpm in
>> my head, it is hard to imagine listening to code and not simply
>> understanding it, like someone talking to me.  I've asked some folks why
>> the difficulty learning code, and they relate something that usually sounds
>> like the "13 WPM barrier" tale.
>>
>> As it turns out, the old way to learn code is all wrong as a universal
>> method.  Code needs to be learned like a language, and at 20 wpm to start
>> with.   But that's not how it's done the old way.   The old way has been
>> around since WWII and the Army Signal Corps. Memorize the alphabet with
>> visual dots and dashes beside it.  Then just keep at it until you don't
>> need the card any more.  Do it with a typewriter from the get go.
>> Eventually a sound in the ear is directly linked to a typewriter key,
>> copied autonomically, and you can carry on an unrelated conversation at the
>> same time.  Buggers don't know what they've copied until they read it on
>> the page.  Really.
>>
>> OF COURSE that worked, FOR THEIR PURPOSES.  People CAN learn code that way.
>> But quite MORE CANNOT.  What did army do?  They sent 100 draftees into a
>> class and then kept the 30 best in the signal corp and sent the other 70
>> back to the infantry.  That WOULD work for an army.  But it clearly is not
>> a universal method, and using dash dot cards prevalently in hamdom all
>> these years produces a 70% who gave up on code, and now use CW decoders in
>> CW contests because CW contests are FUN!!! and CW covers distance way
>> better than SSB.
>>
>> So what's this cr*p about learning code at 20 WPM?  NOBODY can translate 20
>> wpm sound to dididahdahdidit and then to question mark by looking at the
>> card, at 20 WPM.
>>
>> Well, you're exactly right, of course they can't, and that's the point.
>> THAT METHOD is doomed to failure for 70% of those who try it.
>>
>> CW needs to be learned from 20 wpm code SOUNDS.   The *WORD* "and" at 40
>> wpm has a distinctive sound that has nothing to do with letters.  The WORD
>> "and" has the same exact sound at 20, 35, 50 and 75 wpm, if the sending and
>> receiving hasn't mushed the sound and made it indistinct at  higher speeds.
>> Not hearing it at 75 is a matter of INDISTINCTNESS or not concentrating,
>> it's not copy speed.  If it's distinct the word "and"  sounds the same at
>> any speed.
>>
>> One will not be able to copy German at 50 wpm, if you don't know the SOUND
>> of German words in CW.
>>
>> It's like listening to an auctioneer talking really fast.  The issue is
>> making your mind stay up with him and how clearly he ennunciates his fast
>> words.
>>
>> New way.  Code learners hear the sounds of most common letters at 20 wpm
>> right off the bat.  E  T  A N.  You memorize the SOUND,  no visual dots and
>> dashes, no repeating dits and dahs to oneself.  You learn the SOUND of the
>> letter, first off.  Then learn words:   eat   tea   net  at  an  ten
>> Speed is never an issue.  Ever.  Almost nobody fails in this method.
>>
>> You don't need to text decode that code.  You just listen to it, just like
>> listening to SSB.  Except CW has that 10 dB advantage and you get a lot
>> more signals in the same space.
>>
>> Contact W0UCE.   See w0uce.net   Life can be good.  Listen to a CW QSO as
>> you walk around the room doing something else.  Keep firmware 4.51.
>>
>> 73, Guy.
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>
>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html



-----------------------------------------------
Steve Roberts-W1SFR
Sudbury, VT









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Re: K3 CW text decoder

ve3dvy
In reply to this post by Guy, K2AV
Coming from a guy that is trying very hard to learn code,  Its hard to
resist the text decoder but have only used it as a crutch in contests.
 When I am just having day to day QSOs I plod along without the
decoder helping me.  After well over a year of learning CW I find that
I would have been part of that 70% going off to cook school.   I am
struggling and sometimes feel like giving it all up and throw out the
key.   I made the mistake of starting slow and I think that is part of
my problem now.   so for the last little while, at same advice of a
local CW champion, I have been listening to other QSOs plus and using  
the learning program "just learn Morse Code"  sending at least 20WPM
or faster either random words and abreviations or some text files.   I
did have a text file of some 500 plus QSOs  that were great to use for
learning but cant find it.

As for the CW decoder  its nice to have in contests for a beginner but
I think it could also become a bad habit.


David Moes
VE3DVY


On Monday 23/07/2012 at 9:43 am, Guy Olinger K2AV  wrote:

> In the later years, since the no-code decision in USA licensing
> particularly, I have noted an increase of contest QSO's where the
> other end
> obviously copies 25 WPM somehow and only sends 8-10 wpm, and that
> clearly
> on a hand key.
>
> The flurry of complaints, when 4.51 partially unglued the CW text
> decode on
> the K3, further confirms it.
>
> As someone who could copy 20 WPM at age 14, and can still copy 50-60
> wpm in
> my head, it is hard to imagine listening to code and not simply
> understanding it, like someone talking to me.  I've asked some folks
> why
> the difficulty learning code, and they relate something that usually
> sounds
> like the "13 WPM barrier" tale.
>
> As it turns out, the old way to learn code is all wrong as a universal
> method.  Code needs to be learned like a language, and at 20 wpm to
> start
> with.   But that's not how it's done the old way.   The old way has
> been
> around since WWII and the Army Signal Corps. Memorize the alphabet
> with
> visual dots and dashes beside it.  Then just keep at it until you
> don't
> need the card any more.  Do it with a typewriter from the get go.
> Eventually a sound in the ear is directly linked to a typewriter key,
> copied autonomically, and you can carry on an unrelated conversation
> at the
> same time.  Buggers don't know what they've copied until they read it
> on
> the page.  Really.
>
> OF COURSE that worked, FOR THEIR PURPOSES.  People CAN learn code that
> way.
> But quite MORE CANNOT.  What did army do?  They sent 100 draftees into
> a
> class and then kept the 30 best in the signal corp and sent the other
> 70
> back to the infantry.  That WOULD work for an army.  But it clearly is
> not
> a universal method, and using dash dot cards prevalently in hamdom all
> these years produces a 70% who gave up on code, and now use CW
> decoders in
> CW contests because CW contests are FUN!!! and CW covers distance way
> better than SSB.
>
> So what's this cr*p about learning code at 20 WPM?  NOBODY can
> translate 20
> wpm sound to dididahdahdidit and then to question mark by looking at
> the
> card, at 20 WPM.
>
> Well, you're exactly right, of course they can't, and that's the
> point.
> THAT METHOD is doomed to failure for 70% of those who try it.
>
> CW needs to be learned from 20 wpm code SOUNDS.   The *WORD* "and" at
> 40
> wpm has a distinctive sound that has nothing to do with letters.  The
> WORD
> "and" has the same exact sound at 20, 35, 50 and 75 wpm, if the
> sending and
> receiving hasn't mushed the sound and made it indistinct at  higher
> speeds.
> Not hearing it at 75 is a matter of INDISTINCTNESS or not
> concentrating,
> it's not copy speed.  If it's distinct the word "and"  sounds the same
> at
> any speed.
>
> One will not be able to copy German at 50 wpm, if you don't know the
> SOUND
> of German words in CW.
>
> It's like listening to an auctioneer talking really fast.  The issue
> is
> making your mind stay up with him and how clearly he ennunciates his
> fast
> words.
>
> New way.  Code learners hear the sounds of most common letters at 20
> wpm
> right off the bat.  E  T  A N.  You memorize the SOUND,  no visual
> dots and
> dashes, no repeating dits and dahs to oneself.  You learn the SOUND of
> the
> letter, first off.  Then learn words:   eat   tea   net  at  an  ten
> Speed is never an issue.  Ever.  Almost nobody fails in this method.
>
> You don't need to text decode that code.  You just listen to it, just
> like
> listening to SSB.  Except CW has that 10 dB advantage and you get a
> lot
> more signals in the same space.
>
> Contact W0UCE.   See w0uce.net   Life can be good.  Listen to a CW QSO
> as
> you walk around the room doing something else.  Keep firmware 4.51.
>
> 73, Guy.
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html

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Re: K3 CW text decoder

k6dgw
In reply to this post by Millerhill
On 7/23/2012 11:48 AM, Stephen Roberts wrote:

> It was not until recently (about 5 months ago)
> that I got my ticket and plunged back into re-learning CW and
> although I remembered most of the letters, it was not as easy as I
> imagined it would be, especially since I had no experience sending
> and had no idea what a QSO sounded like .

Welcome to Ham Radio CW Steve.

> Well, I'm up to about 25
> WPM at this point and very gradually getting to recognize words. I
> think I'm still a long way from copying in my head 100%, but I'm
> hoping that after about a year, I should be in g ood shape. I've been
> averaging about 4 QSO's a day (I haven't tried the mike on my K2 yet)
> and wish I could do more, but I ain't retired YET and still have to
> chase the almighty dollar around.

You might look into the CW Academy www.cwops.org/cwacademy.html

CWOps is a moderately new group, a little over 1,000 members world-wide
now.  We sponsor the CWT's ... 3 one hour mini-contests on the 2nd and
4th Wed of each month, and the CW Open on the first of September, also 3
sessions, 4 hours each.  Next CWT is this coming Wed.

I don't believe that "head-copy" at 100% exists.  If I'm talking to
someone face-to-face, I don't remember the exact words he says, I digest
and understand what he's communicating to me.  If you can carry on a CW
"conversation" with someone and you understand him, you're copying in
your head.

Copying code groups is easier than making record copy of plain text,
none of it means anything, you just copy what you hear.

73,

Fred K6DGW
- Northern California Contest Club
- CU in the 2012 Cal QSO Party 6-7 Oct 2012
- www.cqp.org

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Re: K3 CW text decoder

Guy, K2AV
Jack, W0UCE, is one of the instructors for CW Academy, and can be
approached that way as well.  73, Guy.

On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 4:21 PM, Fred Jensen <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 7/23/2012 11:48 AM, Stephen Roberts wrote:
>
> > It was not until recently (about 5 months ago)
> > that I got my ticket and plunged back into re-learning CW and
> > although I remembered most of the letters, it was not as easy as I
> > imagined it would be, especially since I had no experience sending
> > and had no idea what a QSO sounded like .
>
> Welcome to Ham Radio CW Steve.
>
> > Well, I'm up to about 25
> > WPM at this point and very gradually getting to recognize words. I
> > think I'm still a long way from copying in my head 100%, but I'm
> > hoping that after about a year, I should be in g ood shape. I've been
> > averaging about 4 QSO's a day (I haven't tried the mike on my K2 yet)
> > and wish I could do more, but I ain't retired YET and still have to
> > chase the almighty dollar around.
>
> You might look into the CW Academy www.cwops.org/cwacademy.html
>
> CWOps is a moderately new group, a little over 1,000 members world-wide
> now.  We sponsor the CWT's ... 3 one hour mini-contests on the 2nd and
> 4th Wed of each month, and the CW Open on the first of September, also 3
> sessions, 4 hours each.  Next CWT is this coming Wed.
>
> I don't believe that "head-copy" at 100% exists.  If I'm talking to
> someone face-to-face, I don't remember the exact words he says, I digest
> and understand what he's communicating to me.  If you can carry on a CW
> "conversation" with someone and you understand him, you're copying in
> your head.
>
> Copying code groups is easier than making record copy of plain text,
> none of it means anything, you just copy what you hear.
>
> 73,
>
> Fred K6DGW
> - Northern California Contest Club
> - CU in the 2012 Cal QSO Party 6-7 Oct 2012
> - www.cqp.org
>
> ______________________________________________________________
> Elecraft mailing list
> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>
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Re: K3 CW text decoder

Tony Scandurra K4QE
In reply to this post by k6dgw
But callsigns are not words.  How does this factor into the "copy in your
head whole words" method?
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Re: K3 CW text decoder

Jim Rogers, W4ATK
In reply to this post by ve3dvy
Bad habit??? Actually, I have found it to be a great device for helping me in increasing my code speed. It allows me to enter into QSOs where the speed would be a problem and as a result as I copy along with the decoder and am beginning to copy words not characters in my head. I use a keyboard for sending quite a bit. As one of advanced age with the accompanying joint problems as well as coordination issues, after a short interval on the paddles I am afraid my code becomes erratic. With the keyboard, I am good to go.

I had to copy 20WPM to graduate from Radioman School (USN) and go on to CT School for my secondary training. Fortunately the Navy recognized I would never be a great CW operator and I was placed in the non-morse "O Branch".  Since O Branch guys had to pass the 20WPM code test to advance in grade, I had to wait quite a while until the forces that be decided that was bit of a stretch for us, and dropped that requirement. So instead of banging on a typewriter, I finished out my tour in a R&D position at Cheltenham, MD. Great fun, new toys, and learned a lot that has stuck with me throughout the years.

The desire to be proficient in code has never left me and at 79 (almost) and 58 (almost) years as an amateur operator I am still looking for improvement. :-))  The decoder is helping me achieve those goals.

73s Jim, W4ATK

On Jul 23, 2012, at 3:15 PM, [hidden email] wrote:

> Coming from a guy that is trying very hard to learn code,  Its hard to
> resist the text decoder but have only used it as a crutch in contests.
> When I am just having day to day QSOs I plod along without the
> decoder helping me.  After well over a year of learning CW I find that
> I would have been part of that 70% going off to cook school.   I am
> struggling and sometimes feel like giving it all up and throw out the
> key.   I made the mistake of starting slow and I think that is part of
> my problem now.   so for the last little while, at same advice of a
> local CW champion, I have been listening to other QSOs plus and using  
> the learning program "just learn Morse Code"  sending at least 20WPM
> or faster either random words and abreviations or some text files.   I
> did have a text file of some 500 plus QSOs  that were great to use for
> learning but cant find it.
>
> As for the CW decoder  its nice to have in contests for a beginner but
> I think it could also become a bad habit.
>
>
> David Moes
> VE3DVY
>
>
> On Monday 23/07/2012 at 9:43 am, Guy Olinger K2AV  wrote:
>> In the later years, since the no-code decision in USA licensing
>> particularly, I have noted an increase of contest QSO's where the
>> other end
>> obviously copies 25 WPM somehow and only sends 8-10 wpm, and that
>> clearly
>> on a hand key.
>>
>> The flurry of complaints, when 4.51 partially unglued the CW text
>> decode on
>> the K3, further confirms it.
>>
>> As someone who could copy 20 WPM at age 14, and can still copy 50-60
>> wpm in
>> my head, it is hard to imagine listening to code and not simply
>> understanding it, like someone talking to me.  I've asked some folks
>> why
>> the difficulty learning code, and they relate something that usually
>> sounds
>> like the "13 WPM barrier" tale.
>>
>> As it turns out, the old way to learn code is all wrong as a universal
>> method.  Code needs to be learned like a language, and at 20 wpm to
>> start
>> with.   But that's not how it's done the old way.   The old way has
>> been
>> around since WWII and the Army Signal Corps. Memorize the alphabet
>> with
>> visual dots and dashes beside it.  Then just keep at it until you
>> don't
>> need the card any more.  Do it with a typewriter from the get go.
>> Eventually a sound in the ear is directly linked to a typewriter key,
>> copied autonomically, and you can carry on an unrelated conversation
>> at the
>> same time.  Buggers don't know what they've copied until they read it
>> on
>> the page.  Really.
>>
>> OF COURSE that worked, FOR THEIR PURPOSES.  People CAN learn code that
>> way.
>> But quite MORE CANNOT.  What did army do?  They sent 100 draftees into
>> a
>> class and then kept the 30 best in the signal corp and sent the other
>> 70
>> back to the infantry.  That WOULD work for an army.  But it clearly is
>> not
>> a universal method, and using dash dot cards prevalently in hamdom all
>> these years produces a 70% who gave up on code, and now use CW
>> decoders in
>> CW contests because CW contests are FUN!!! and CW covers distance way
>> better than SSB.
>>
>> So what's this cr*p about learning code at 20 WPM?  NOBODY can
>> translate 20
>> wpm sound to dididahdahdidit and then to question mark by looking at
>> the
>> card, at 20 WPM.
>>
>> Well, you're exactly right, of course they can't, and that's the
>> point.
>> THAT METHOD is doomed to failure for 70% of those who try it.
>>
>> CW needs to be learned from 20 wpm code SOUNDS.   The *WORD* "and" at
>> 40
>> wpm has a distinctive sound that has nothing to do with letters.  The
>> WORD
>> "and" has the same exact sound at 20, 35, 50 and 75 wpm, if the
>> sending and
>> receiving hasn't mushed the sound and made it indistinct at  higher
>> speeds.
>> Not hearing it at 75 is a matter of INDISTINCTNESS or not
>> concentrating,
>> it's not copy speed.  If it's distinct the word "and"  sounds the same
>> at
>> any speed.
>>
>> One will not be able to copy German at 50 wpm, if you don't know the
>> SOUND
>> of German words in CW.
>>
>> It's like listening to an auctioneer talking really fast.  The issue
>> is
>> making your mind stay up with him and how clearly he ennunciates his
>> fast
>> words.
>>
>> New way.  Code learners hear the sounds of most common letters at 20
>> wpm
>> right off the bat.  E  T  A N.  You memorize the SOUND,  no visual
>> dots and
>> dashes, no repeating dits and dahs to oneself.  You learn the SOUND of
>> the
>> letter, first off.  Then learn words:   eat   tea   net  at  an  ten
>> Speed is never an issue.  Ever.  Almost nobody fails in this method.
>>
>> You don't need to text decode that code.  You just listen to it, just
>> like
>> listening to SSB.  Except CW has that 10 dB advantage and you get a
>> lot
>> more signals in the same space.
>>
>> Contact W0UCE.   See w0uce.net   Life can be good.  Listen to a CW QSO
>> as
>> you walk around the room doing something else.  Keep firmware 4.51.
>>
>> 73, Guy.
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>
>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>
> ______________________________________________________________
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>
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> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html

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Re: K3 CW text decoder

Guy, K2AV
In reply to this post by Guy, K2AV
The main CW document on Jacks web page might be missed.  There are buttons
on the bottom of the main page.  You want the button that says "Morse Code"
or click on
   http://www.w0uce.net/Morsecode.html

There is also a PDF of some of the class material as a link on the Morse
Code page.

Jack's classes are conducted interactively over the internet using ooVoo
video conferencing, which is a free application.

To sign up for Jack's classes you need to go through CW Academy and ask to
be assigned to W0UCE.

73, Guy.

On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Guy Olinger K2AV <[hidden email]>wrote:

> Jack, W0UCE, is one of the instructors for CW Academy, and can be
> approached that way as well.  73, Guy.
>
> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 4:21 PM, Fred Jensen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> On 7/23/2012 11:48 AM, Stephen Roberts wrote:
>>
>> > It was not until recently (about 5 months ago)
>> > that I got my ticket and plunged back into re-learning CW and
>> > although I remembered most of the letters, it was not as easy as I
>> > imagined it would be, especially since I had no experience sending
>> > and had no idea what a QSO sounded like .
>>
>> Welcome to Ham Radio CW Steve.
>>
>> > Well, I'm up to about 25
>> > WPM at this point and very gradually getting to recognize words. I
>> > think I'm still a long way from copying in my head 100%, but I'm
>> > hoping that after about a year, I should be in g ood shape. I've been
>> > averaging about 4 QSO's a day (I haven't tried the mike on my K2 yet)
>> > and wish I could do more, but I ain't retired YET and still have to
>> > chase the almighty dollar around.
>>
>> You might look into the CW Academy www.cwops.org/cwacademy.html
>>
>> CWOps is a moderately new group, a little over 1,000 members world-wide
>> now.  We sponsor the CWT's ... 3 one hour mini-contests on the 2nd and
>> 4th Wed of each month, and the CW Open on the first of September, also 3
>> sessions, 4 hours each.  Next CWT is this coming Wed.
>>
>> I don't believe that "head-copy" at 100% exists.  If I'm talking to
>> someone face-to-face, I don't remember the exact words he says, I digest
>> and understand what he's communicating to me.  If you can carry on a CW
>> "conversation" with someone and you understand him, you're copying in
>> your head.
>>
>> Copying code groups is easier than making record copy of plain text,
>> none of it means anything, you just copy what you hear.
>>
>> 73,
>>
>> Fred K6DGW
>> - Northern California Contest Club
>> - CU in the 2012 Cal QSO Party 6-7 Oct 2012
>> - www.cqp.org
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
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>>
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>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>>
>
>
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Re: K3 CW text decoder

Vic Rosenthal 4X6GP/K2VCO
In reply to this post by Millerhill
When I first got my ticket (56 short years ago) I struggled with the
code. I even flunked my 13 wpm General test the first time. That was
because I was 'hearing' individual letters instead of larger units.

I got interested in traffic handling and had to write down what I was
hearing. After awhile I started hearing little groups of letters and
then words. It was necessary, because otherwise I couldn't write fast
enough!

I guess it took about a year (but of course I was a teenager). Now I can
copy about 55 in my head. There is a second 'hump' around 60 wpm that I
never tried to get over. It represents a different way of hearing the
code, just like hearing words is different from hearing letters.


On 7/23/12 11:48 AM, Stephen Roberts wrote:
> Hey...I resemble that remark!
>
> Ok...well I'm one of those poor recruits that happened to score well in the cw aptitude test although I had absolutely no prior knowledge of the code. After 6 months at CT school in Pensecola, I was merrily copying away with...yes...wait for it...a typewriter. NO way I could even come close to copying in my head. As Guy said, copying 5 letter code groups was the primary gig and it was all just a mechanical reaction to a letter sound. After leaving the Navy, I never pursued cw or becoming a ham. It was not until recently (about 5 months ago) that I got my ticket and plunged back into re-learning CW and although I remembered most of the letters, it was not as easy as I imagined it would be, especially since I had no experience sending and had no idea what a QSO sounded like . Well, I'm up to about 25 WPM at this point and very gradually getting to recognize words. I think I'm still a long way from copying in my head 100%, but I'm hoping that after about a year, I should be in
  g
>   ood shape. I've been averaging about 4 QSO's a day (I haven't tried the mike on my K2 yet) and wish I could do more, but I ain't retired YET and still have to chase the almighty dollar around.
>
> So all of you "I can copy in my head at 60 WPM"...how long did it take you to learn how to do that?
>
> 73
> Steve


--
Vic, K2VCO
Fresno CA
http://www.qsl.net/k2vco/


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Re: K3 CW text decoder

k6dgw
In reply to this post by Tony Scandurra K4QE
On 7/23/2012 1:37 PM, Anthony Scandurra wrote:
> But callsigns are not words.  How does this factor into the "copy in your
> head whole words" method?

Well, a call sign is a code-group, some more than 5 characters.  Most of
the time, I know when I'm expecting a call sign, and I type it as if it
was just a code group.  No meaning [well ... if it started with 3D2 and
ended with C, it would have meaning. :-) ], but you probably get the idea.

I'm sure everyone's personal experience is very different, but for me in
a CW "conversation," I listen to it like the op was just talking to me.
  Some words are important ... "Chicago" out of, "My QTH is Chicago
Chicago" ... "K3 and tribander", out of "Running a K3/100 and tribander
hr at 45 ft"  Honestly, if I miss the 45, I don't care how high his
antenna is anyway, and the "feet" at the end tells me what that was if
QSB got the "45".

Some of the words are predictable ... "Got dinner call, 73 -----".

Much of communications is predictable over the short term.  If we're
face to face and you say, "Man, that last business trip ---," I'm
looking for a description, maybe not good.  All you have to do is
understand enough to know what's likely coming next, and pick out the
important words.

I learned a passable speaking fluency in Lao when I was in Laos in the
60's.  Lots of stuff I didn't understand, but I could spot the clues as
to what was coming next and was important.  I don't think CW is a
"language," as much as it's an audio alphabet for a language we already
know.  There *is* a language element in CW, abbreviations, acronyms, and
Q-signals, but most of it is just listening to someone talk to you using
an audio code rather than spoken words.  The language part is not much
different than having the network geek explain why your wireless router
won't connect to your TiVo. :-)

73,

Fred K6DGW
- Northern California Contest Club
- CU in the 2012 Cal QSO Party 6-7 Oct 2012
- www.cqp.org

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Re: K3 CW text decoder

ve3dvy
In reply to this post by Jim Rogers, W4ATK
Hi Jim.  Thanks     don't get me wrong.    I think I was probably
speaking to a more personal effect.   I have found that when I am
watching the display my brain stops decoding.  so for me its definitely
a bad habit.  I avoid using it for that reason.  I can see that this
tool is very useful and for many a learning aid but thats just not for
me.    In a contest however when I am in a more doing than learning mode
the decoder is a lifeline!

Several years ago I had my first introduction to a  CW operator that
made it look so easy and worked effortlessly.    while at Field Day he
was sending, and recieving at breakneck speed.  I was in a position that
I needed his input on a problem I was having with the logging program.  
I stood and waited till he finished a QSO started tuning to the next
station before I asked a question.   Giving me full attention he gave me
the answer I needed and we continued talking a little about another
situation.  while doing so he continued at his key making several more
QSOs without stopping.  I was so amazed at the skill that Ken had that I
have set my goals to be that good.

Cheers and 73
Dave

On 7/23/2012 4:38 PM, W4ATK wrote:

> Bad habit??? Actually, I have found it to be a great device for helping me in increasing my code speed. It allows me to enter into QSOs where the speed would be a problem and as a result as I copy along with the decoder and am beginning to copy words not characters in my head. I use a keyboard for sending quite a bit. As one of advanced age with the accompanying joint problems as well as coordination issues, after a short interval on the paddles I am afraid my code becomes erratic. With the keyboard, I am good to go.
>
> I had to copy 20WPM to graduate from Radioman School (USN) and go on to CT School for my secondary training. Fortunately the Navy recognized I would never be a great CW operator and I was placed in the non-morse "O Branch".  Since O Branch guys had to pass the 20WPM code test to advance in grade, I had to wait quite a while until the forces that be decided that was bit of a stretch for us, and dropped that requirement. So instead of banging on a typewriter, I finished out my tour in a R&D position at Cheltenham, MD. Great fun, new toys, and learned a lot that has stuck with me throughout the years.
>
> The desire to be proficient in code has never left me and at 79 (almost) and 58 (almost) years as an amateur operator I am still looking for improvement. :-))  The decoder is helping me achieve those goals.
>
> 73s Jim, W4ATK
>
> On Jul 23, 2012, at 3:15 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>
>> Coming from a guy that is trying very hard to learn code,  Its hard to
>> resist the text decoder but have only used it as a crutch in contests.
>> When I am just having day to day QSOs I plod along without the
>> decoder helping me.  After well over a year of learning CW I find that
>> I would have been part of that 70% going off to cook school.   I am
>> struggling and sometimes feel like giving it all up and throw out the
>> key.   I made the mistake of starting slow and I think that is part of
>> my problem now.   so for the last little while, at same advice of a
>> local CW champion, I have been listening to other QSOs plus and using
>> the learning program "just learn Morse Code"  sending at least 20WPM
>> or faster either random words and abreviations or some text files.   I
>> did have a text file of some 500 plus QSOs  that were great to use for
>> learning but cant find it.
>>
>> As for the CW decoder  its nice to have in contests for a beginner but
>> I think it could also become a bad habit.
>>
>>
>> David Moes
>> VE3DVY
>>
>>
>> On Monday 23/07/2012 at 9:43 am, Guy Olinger K2AV  wrote:
>>> In the later years, since the no-code decision in USA licensing
>>> particularly, I have noted an increase of contest QSO's where the
>>> other end
>>> obviously copies 25 WPM somehow and only sends 8-10 wpm, and that
>>> clearly
>>> on a hand key.
>>>
>>> The flurry of complaints, when 4.51 partially unglued the CW text
>>> decode on
>>> the K3, further confirms it.
>>>
>>> As someone who could copy 20 WPM at age 14, and can still copy 50-60
>>> wpm in
>>> my head, it is hard to imagine listening to code and not simply
>>> understanding it, like someone talking to me.  I've asked some folks
>>> why
>>> the difficulty learning code, and they relate something that usually
>>> sounds
>>> like the "13 WPM barrier" tale.
>>>
>>> As it turns out, the old way to learn code is all wrong as a universal
>>> method.  Code needs to be learned like a language, and at 20 wpm to
>>> start
>>> with.   But that's not how it's done the old way.   The old way has
>>> been
>>> around since WWII and the Army Signal Corps. Memorize the alphabet
>>> with
>>> visual dots and dashes beside it.  Then just keep at it until you
>>> don't
>>> need the card any more.  Do it with a typewriter from the get go.
>>> Eventually a sound in the ear is directly linked to a typewriter key,
>>> copied autonomically, and you can carry on an unrelated conversation
>>> at the
>>> same time.  Buggers don't know what they've copied until they read it
>>> on
>>> the page.  Really.
>>>
>>> OF COURSE that worked, FOR THEIR PURPOSES.  People CAN learn code that
>>> way.
>>> But quite MORE CANNOT.  What did army do?  They sent 100 draftees into
>>> a
>>> class and then kept the 30 best in the signal corp and sent the other
>>> 70
>>> back to the infantry.  That WOULD work for an army.  But it clearly is
>>> not
>>> a universal method, and using dash dot cards prevalently in hamdom all
>>> these years produces a 70% who gave up on code, and now use CW
>>> decoders in
>>> CW contests because CW contests are FUN!!! and CW covers distance way
>>> better than SSB.
>>>
>>> So what's this cr*p about learning code at 20 WPM?  NOBODY can
>>> translate 20
>>> wpm sound to dididahdahdidit and then to question mark by looking at
>>> the
>>> card, at 20 WPM.
>>>
>>> Well, you're exactly right, of course they can't, and that's the
>>> point.
>>> THAT METHOD is doomed to failure for 70% of those who try it.
>>>
>>> CW needs to be learned from 20 wpm code SOUNDS.   The *WORD* "and" at
>>> 40
>>> wpm has a distinctive sound that has nothing to do with letters.  The
>>> WORD
>>> "and" has the same exact sound at 20, 35, 50 and 75 wpm, if the
>>> sending and
>>> receiving hasn't mushed the sound and made it indistinct at  higher
>>> speeds.
>>> Not hearing it at 75 is a matter of INDISTINCTNESS or not
>>> concentrating,
>>> it's not copy speed.  If it's distinct the word "and"  sounds the same
>>> at
>>> any speed.
>>>
>>> One will not be able to copy German at 50 wpm, if you don't know the
>>> SOUND
>>> of German words in CW.
>>>
>>> It's like listening to an auctioneer talking really fast.  The issue
>>> is
>>> making your mind stay up with him and how clearly he ennunciates his
>>> fast
>>> words.
>>>
>>> New way.  Code learners hear the sounds of most common letters at 20
>>> wpm
>>> right off the bat.  E  T  A N.  You memorize the SOUND,  no visual
>>> dots and
>>> dashes, no repeating dits and dahs to oneself.  You learn the SOUND of
>>> the
>>> letter, first off.  Then learn words:   eat   tea   net  at  an  ten
>>> Speed is never an issue.  Ever.  Almost nobody fails in this method.
>>>
>>> You don't need to text decode that code.  You just listen to it, just
>>> like
>>> listening to SSB.  Except CW has that 10 dB advantage and you get a
>>> lot
>>> more signals in the same space.
>>>
>>> Contact W0UCE.   See w0uce.net   Life can be good.  Listen to a CW QSO
>>> as
>>> you walk around the room doing something else.  Keep firmware 4.51.
>>>
>>> 73, Guy.
>>> ______________________________________________________________
>>> Elecraft mailing list
>>> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
>>> Help: http://mailman.qth.net/mmfaq.htm
>>> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>>>
>>> This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net
>>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>> ______________________________________________________________
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Re: K3 CW text decoder

RobertG
In reply to this post by ve3dvy
David...

I think one hurdle to leap is accepting that one is learning a second
language, and that regardless of learning method, time and repetition is
necessary. I think that people tend to look for a short cut to learning
CW, some trick that will take the work out of it.

Given that, I have found two computer programs very helpful to me for
increasing CW speed. RUFZ allows selection of individual
letters/numbers, groups of any length, and any speed desired. I've set
on a pattern of 3-letter groups at 40wpm, 4-letter groups at 35wpm, etc
all the way down to my base practice of 7-letter groups at 25wpm. The
program requires keyboard entry, and it keeps score. Lots of goodies. I
think this program helps with "mental dexterity" and the associated
skill of moving forward and not getting bogged down with individual
letters.

The second program is G4FON which provides random words at all letter
speeds and word speeds. Sample qso's are also included. I've made up
several text files of words from three letters long up to 10 letters
long. This provides the "sound of the word" as others have mentioned.

I've been going back and forth with these two programs, usually 15min
with each for one learning session, and I try to do this daily. I also
tune 40m and look for folks having high speed qso's, and listen in as
best as I can. Using these three methods together, my qso speed is
pretty good at 25wpm with 30wpm coming into sight. All this at age 72
years.

Also to note, one doesn't need to copy perfectly to figure out what's
being said. If one copies "ant__na" it's pretty clear that the word is
"antenna." The same with whole words. The meaning "emerges" from the
stream of dots and dashes rather than lining up sequentially. At least
that's what it's like with me.

So, to summarize...
lots of practice [and patience],
listening at high speed to small groups,
listening to words at all speeds, and
eavesdropping.

Not to mention getting on and doing CW qso's!

Good luck.

...robert

On 7/23/2012 21:15, [hidden email] wrote:

> Coming from a guy that is trying very hard to learn code,  Its hard to
> resist the text decoder but have only used it as a crutch in contests.
>   When I am just having day to day QSOs I plod along without the
> decoder helping me.  After well over a year of learning CW I find that
> I would have been part of that 70% going off to cook school.   I am
> struggling and sometimes feel like giving it all up and throw out the
> key.   I made the mistake of starting slow and I think that is part of
> my problem now.   so for the last little while, at same advice of a
> local CW champion, I have been listening to other QSOs plus and using
> the learning program "just learn Morse Code"  sending at least 20WPM
> or faster either random words and abreviations or some text files.   I
> did have a text file of some 500 plus QSOs  that were great to use for
> learning but cant find it.
>
> As for the CW decoder  its nice to have in contests for a beginner but
> I think it could also become a bad habit.
>
>
> David Moes
> VE3DVY
>
>
> On Monday 23/07/2012 at 9:43 am, Guy Olinger K2AV  wrote:
>> In the later years, since the no-code decision in USA licensing
>> particularly, I have noted an increase of contest QSO's where the
>> other end
>> obviously copies 25 WPM somehow and only sends 8-10 wpm, and that
>> clearly
>> on a hand key.
>>
>> The flurry of complaints, when 4.51 partially unglued the CW text
>> decode on
>> the K3, further confirms it.
>>
>> As someone who could copy 20 WPM at age 14, and can still copy 50-60
>> wpm in
>> my head, it is hard to imagine listening to code and not simply
>> understanding it, like someone talking to me.  I've asked some folks
>> why
>> the difficulty learning code, and they relate something that usually
>> sounds
>> like the "13 WPM barrier" tale.
>>
>> As it turns out, the old way to learn code is all wrong as a universal
>> method.  Code needs to be learned like a language, and at 20 wpm to
>> start
>> with.   But that's not how it's done the old way.   The old way has
>> been
>> around since WWII and the Army Signal Corps. Memorize the alphabet
>> with
>> visual dots and dashes beside it.  Then just keep at it until you
>> don't
>> need the card any more.  Do it with a typewriter from the get go.
>> Eventually a sound in the ear is directly linked to a typewriter key,
>> copied autonomically, and you can carry on an unrelated conversation
>> at the
>> same time.  Buggers don't know what they've copied until they read it
>> on
>> the page.  Really.
>>
>> OF COURSE that worked, FOR THEIR PURPOSES.  People CAN learn code that
>> way.
>> But quite MORE CANNOT.  What did army do?  They sent 100 draftees into
>> a
>> class and then kept the 30 best in the signal corp and sent the other
>> 70
>> back to the infantry.  That WOULD work for an army.  But it clearly is
>> not
>> a universal method, and using dash dot cards prevalently in hamdom all
>> these years produces a 70% who gave up on code, and now use CW
>> decoders in
>> CW contests because CW contests are FUN!!! and CW covers distance way
>> better than SSB.
>>
>> So what's this cr*p about learning code at 20 WPM?  NOBODY can
>> translate 20
>> wpm sound to dididahdahdidit and then to question mark by looking at
>> the
>> card, at 20 WPM.
>>
>> Well, you're exactly right, of course they can't, and that's the
>> point.
>> THAT METHOD is doomed to failure for 70% of those who try it.
>>
>> CW needs to be learned from 20 wpm code SOUNDS.   The *WORD* "and" at
>> 40
>> wpm has a distinctive sound that has nothing to do with letters.  The
>> WORD
>> "and" has the same exact sound at 20, 35, 50 and 75 wpm, if the
>> sending and
>> receiving hasn't mushed the sound and made it indistinct at  higher
>> speeds.
>> Not hearing it at 75 is a matter of INDISTINCTNESS or not
>> concentrating,
>> it's not copy speed.  If it's distinct the word "and"  sounds the same
>> at
>> any speed.
>>
>> One will not be able to copy German at 50 wpm, if you don't know the
>> SOUND
>> of German words in CW.
>>
>> It's like listening to an auctioneer talking really fast.  The issue
>> is
>> making your mind stay up with him and how clearly he ennunciates his
>> fast
>> words.
>>
>> New way.  Code learners hear the sounds of most common letters at 20
>> wpm
>> right off the bat.  E  T  A N.  You memorize the SOUND,  no visual
>> dots and
>> dashes, no repeating dits and dahs to oneself.  You learn the SOUND of
>> the
>> letter, first off.  Then learn words:   eat   tea   net  at  an  ten
>> Speed is never an issue.  Ever.  Almost nobody fails in this method.
>>
>> You don't need to text decode that code.  You just listen to it, just
>> like
>> listening to SSB.  Except CW has that 10 dB advantage and you get a
>> lot
>> more signals in the same space.
>>
>> Contact W0UCE.   See w0uce.net   Life can be good.  Listen to a CW QSO
>> as
>> you walk around the room doing something else.  Keep firmware 4.51.
>>
>> 73, Guy.
>> ______________________________________________________________
>> Elecraft mailing list
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>>
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>> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
>
> ______________________________________________________________
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> Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/elecraft
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> Post: mailto:[hidden email]
>
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> Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html
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--
Robert G. Strickland, PhD, ABPH - KE2WY
[hidden email]
Syracuse, New York, USA
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Re: K3 CW text decoder

Fred Atchley-2
In reply to this post by Guy, K2AV
>Snip

 

"The second program is G4FON which provides random words at all letter
speeds and word speeds. Sample qso's are also included. I've made up several
text files of words from three letters long up to 10 letters long. This
provides the "sound of the word" as others have mentioned."

 

>End snip

 

I've made use of the G4FON text file feature to create make-believe contest
signals for In-state and out-of-state (California), then play them back
while entering them into WriteLog contest software. Since there are 58
multipliers in the CQP each text file contains 58 different recorded
contacts. I.e.:

 

K6SUJ <pause>    R 123  SDIE

W4VQG <pause> R 44   TN

               .

               .

KH6KO  <pause> R 105  HI

VE7RSI  <pause> R  277 BC

               .

Etc.

 

This helps me get off to a good start for a contest with everything hooked
up like for real. At 76 years young I need I need all the help I can get.
Like the man said, contests are fun.

 

73, Fred, AE6IC

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